Tubelite hosted open house at Dallas/Fort Worth facility

Tubelite_Tour_Oct2014Tubelite_Tour-CNC_Oct14Tubelite’s plant manager, Marty Bergey, hosted a tour of the Dallas/Fort Worth facility during the company’s open house on Oct. 9 celebrating the completion of a 27,000-square-foot expansion. The expansion accommodates on-site CNC machining for door and frame fabrication, as well as warehousing stock products. Located at 4900 Langdon Road is on the southeast side of Dallas and near the I-20 / I-45 interchange, the building is easily accessible to accommodate shipping needs and is centralized within the region to provide fast lead-times and damage-free shipments to our customers in the region.

“We had outstanding feedback from customers regarding the organization of the facility, fabrication, inventory availability, service center set-up, our product line and Tubelite’s commitment to the area,” said Amy Cole, president of Tubelite Inc.

 

Tubelite_Tour-Entry_Oct14

Utah State University’s Wayne Estes Center attracts student athletes with Tubelite curtainwall’s daylight and views

Tubelite_UT_USUtrainingCtr6_TysonBybee_webIn his 20-plus years of coaching, Stew Morrill never had an office with a window. Now, Utah State University’s (USU’s) head basketball coach enjoys a gorgeous view of Cache Valley and the Wellsville Mountains framed by Tubelite’s curtainwall systems. Morill’s office is part of the University’s recently completed 32,744 square-foot Wayne Estes Training Center, which houses the campus’ basketball practice facility and 1,400-seat volleyball court. The center seeks LEED® Silver certification from the U.S. Green Building Council, a standard that all new USU projects within the last seven years has earned.

Morrill tours USU recruits through the Center with pride and happily hosts them in his office — something he and his staff had never done before the new facility opened in May 2014. The expansive glass and metal façade that characterizes his office — and the $9.7 million facility as a whole — gives the building the aesthetic and practical appeal crucial for competing in the ultra-competitive recruiting environment of college athletics.

The impressive, daylight-filled lobby interior of the new facility, recognizes the Center’s namesake, Wayne Estes, as the greatest basketball player in USU’s history. He played for the Aggies from 1963 to 1965 and likely would have gone on to play in the NBA, but died in an electrical accident in 1965. He was posthumously given All-American honor  by the Associated Press, and was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1967. A large mural, memorabilia and a touchscreen educational kiosk share his life’s story in the building that serves as a tribute to his legacy. In addition to the memorial lobby and the office space, the facility contains a training room, strength-and-conditioning area, two regulation-size basketball courts and a regulation-size volleyball competition court.

Before the Center came online, USU was utilizing a nearby high school court for some of its basketball and volleyball practices, because there was not enough court space available on campus. These scheduling challenges were in turn causing interruptions to student-athletes’ class schedules. “Wayne Estes Center provides an outstanding opportunity to recruit student-athletes because of the services it provides, and the wow factor it has,” said Scott Barnes, USU vice president and director of athletics.”

Tubelite_UT_USUtrainingCtr9_TysonBybee_webDesigned by VCBO Architecture, USU’s new Wayne Estes Training Center was built by Okland Construction on a 10-month timeline. Beginning in September 2013, glazing contractor Steel Encounters Inc. installed the Center’s signature exterior curtainwall using Tubelite’s 400 Series system. Using Tubelite’s standard sun shade clips, Ducworks Inc. added a stainless steel, laser-cut, bull-shaped “Aggie” logo to accent the building.

The room above the court is called “the closing room,” because it presents such an enticing view for recruits visiting the facility. “The curtainwall system that contains the ‘closing room’ had to be as unobstructed as possible to enhance game views from this location,” notes VCBO’s principal, Derek Payne, AIA, LEED AP. “Potential recruits, potential donors and important visitors will all enjoy games from this location. The look of the cantilevering glass cube from the court below is also important. The sleek, mullionless look of this projection into the playing venue adds a bit of surprise and elegance to the game environment.”

Along with its attractive design, USU’s Wayne Estes Training Center was built to meet performance standards set by Utah’s Division of Facilities Construction & Management’s State Building Energy Efficiency Program (DFCM’s SBEEP). This program works to increase energy efficiency in both new and existing state buildings, and includes design and building to LEED Silver requirements. Since 2006, SBEEP reports more than $11 million in energy cost savings. Exemplifying this, Utah’s DFCM introduced an innovative approach to building envelope design on all new buildings that allow the mechanical systems to be downsized, along with significant reduction in ongoing utility costs and associated emissions.

Emphasizing the long-term savings, DFCM’s energy development director John Burningham wrote in the division’s recent newsletter (Second Quarter 2014): “Over the years DFCM has learned the immense value of having high performing building envelopes. Quality systems that perform as designed provide value to the building and its occupants for decades. Unlike mechanical systems that generally have an expected life of 10 to 20 years, the components of the building envelope generally last the entire life of the building. DFCM has one, if not the, most rigorous envelope programs in the nation to ensure the skin of the building is designed and installed with long term performance in mind.”

Tubelite_UT_USUtrainingCtr7_TysonBybee_webTo support the Center’s energy-efficiency and LEED Silver certification goals, Tubelite’s curtainwall was specified with a fiberglass pressure plate and PPG’s Solarban® low-e glass, achieving a maximum solar heat gain coefficient of (SHGC) 0.34 and U-Factor of 0.39 BTU/hr.sqft.ºF. With the fiberglass pressure plate, the framing system also delivers a high condensation resistance factor (CRF) of 76.

Tubelite’s 400 Series curtainwall with fiberglass pressure plate has a 2.5-inch sightline and the strength of variable-depth back-members from 4 to 7 inches. Minimizing the need for on-site cutting and fabricating, screw holes and weeps are machined at the factory into the off-white, pultruded fiberglass material.

The curtainwall system’s metal back-members and snap-on covers can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition. This also may contribute to obtaining additional credits as outlined by LEED. Enhancing the project’s environmental attributes, longevity and metallic appearance, the aluminum components were finished by Linetec using Class II clear anodize, which contains no volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Anodize process by-products are recyclable and anodized aluminum is 100 percent recyclable. Because anodize is an integral part of the substrate, the coating delivers excellent wear and abrasion resistance with minimal maintenance.

“Student-athletes have been absolutely blown away by how nice this facility is,” stated USU’s Barnes. “What sets the Wayne Estes Center apart is its functionality as both a first-class basketball practice and elite volleyball competition venue. Our men and women’s basketball and volleyball coaches have some of the best office views in the entire valley and the finishes are spectacular.”

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Wayne Estes Training Center, Utah State University Athletics, 800 E. and 900 N., Logan, Utah 84321; http://www.utahstateaggies.com
Owner: Utah State University; Logan, Utah; http://www.usu.edu
Project manager: State of Utah, Division of Facilities Construction & Management; Salt Lake City; http://dfcm.utah.gov
Architect: VCBO Architecture; Salt Lake City; http://www.vcbo.com
General contractor: Okland Construction; http://www.okland.com
Glazing contractor: Steel Encounters Inc.; Salt Lake City; http://steelencounters.com
Specialty signage – fabricator and installer: Ducworks, Inc.; Logan, Utah
Glazing systems – manufacturer: Tubelite Inc.; Walker, Michigan; http://www.tubeliteinc.com
Glazing systems – glass assemblies: PPG Industries; Solarban® 70; http://www.ppg.com
Glazing systems – finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wisconsin; http://www.linetec.com
Photographers: Larry Ford, Steel Encounters Inc.; and Tyson Bybee, Bybee Photography LLC

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Idaho’s tallest building showcases Tubelite’s curtainwall and entrances

Wausau-Tubelite_OH_8thMain-1_MarcWalters_webRising above Boise’s skyline to become the tallest in Idaho, Eighth and Main prominently features Tubelite Inc.’s 400 Series curtainwall and entrances plus Wausau Window and Wall Systems’ INvision™ Series unitized curtainwall and ClearStory™ sun shades. The $76 million, 18-story mixed-use building opened Feb. 15, 2014, and is pursing Silver certification through the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® rating system.

The project’s architect of record, CTA Architects Engineers, not only designed the superstructure, but also occupies the 8th floor. On the 9th floor are Babcock Design Group’s offices, the architectural firm that served as the design architect for the overall project and the building envelope.

Built on a vacant lot known as the “Boise Hole,” the project erased an infamous eyesore from the city’s downtown. Constructing more than 390,000 square feet of Class A office, retail and restaurant space, it has brought new tenants and business to Boise’s downtown.

Wausau-Tubelite_OH_8thMain-4_MarcWalters_webBuilding owner The Gardner Company, a full service real estate company, prides itself on partnering with companies that implement the highest of standards. This includes designing and constructing to LEED criteria, minimizing impact on the environment. To realize The Gardner Company’s vision, CTA collaborated with Babcock Design Group, general contractor Engineered Structures Inc. (ESI), plus other key building team members to create a cost-effective, durable and energy-efficient building.

ESI broke ground on the project in July 2012. By Spring 2013, Tubelite’s curtainwall and entrances started arriving at Eighth and Main’s job site. D&A Glass Company, Inc. installed Tubelite’s systems on the first two floors. Above these, D&A installed 72,000 square feet of Wausau’s unitized curtainwall, custom canopies and other finishing details.

Supporting the project’s energy-efficient and environmental attributes, Viracon’s high-performance insulating, laminated glass was used throughout the curtainwall, storefront and entrance systems. In addition to the curtainwall and sun shades, Wausau provided zero sightline vents, custom interior stools, and other aluminum-framed architectural building products.

Wausau-Tubelite_OH_8thMain-5_MarcWalters_webBoth Wausau’s and Tubelite’s aluminum extrusions from secondary billet contain at least 70% total recycled content. Linetec painted all of the aluminum framing in a 70% PVDF finish. This high-performance architectural coating meets the most stringent, exterior, architectural specification, American Architectural Manufacturers Association’s AAMA-2605. As an environmentally responsible finisher, Linetec safely captures and destroys the liquid paint’s volatile organic compounds (VOC) content before the finished material arrives at the job site.

At Eighth and Main’s grand opening ceremony on Feb. 15, 2014, Boise’s mayor David H. Bieter praised the building as the “crown jewel” of the city’s downtown. Current tenants include: Zions Bank, Holland & Hart, Parsons Behle & Latimer, A10 Capitol, Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, Flatbread Pizza Company, On the Fly Deli and Zenergy Health Club.

Wausau-Tubelite_OH_8thMain-2_MarcWalters_webAnchor tenant Zions Bank hosted a free community grand opening that included family activities, local food trucks and a rock concert. Scott Anderson, president and CEO of Zions Bank, noted, “We believe that this epic celebration is fitting as we close the books on ‘the Hole’ and pay tribute to the beautiful new building that’s taken its place as the tallest in Idaho.”

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Eighth and Main, 800 W. Main St., Boise, Idaho  83702
* Owner: Gardner Company; Boise, Idaho; http://www.gardnercompany.net
* Architect of Record: CTA Architects Engineers; Boise, Idaho; http://ctagroup.com
* Design Architect – building envelope: Babcock Design Group; Boise, Idaho, and Salt Lake City; http://www.babcockdesign.com
* General Contractor: Engineered Structures Inc. (ESI); Meridian, Idaho; http://www.esiconstruction.com
* Glazing contractor: D&A Glass Company, Inc.; Boise, Idaho; http://www.daglass.net
* Glazing systems – curtainwall manufacturer: Wausau Window and Wall Systems, INvision Series curtainwall and ClearStory sun shades; Wausau, Wisconsin; http://www.wausauwindow.com
* Glazing systems – entrances manufacturer: Tubelite Inc., entrance systems and 400 Series curtainwall; Walker, Michigan; http://www.tubeliteinc.com
* Glazing systems – glass: Viracon; Owatonna, Minnesota; http://www.viracon.com
* Glazing systems – finisher: Linetec, Wausau, Wisconsin; http://www.linetec.com
* Photographer: Marc Walters Photography
* Video: TreJuice Films, Trevor Atkinson, http://vimeo.com/77342437

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Event: ALA Annual Midwest Architecture Conference, Sept. 30

Tubelite will showcase its products and solutions at the Association of Licensed Architects (ALA) 16th Annual Midwest Architecture Conference. Held Sept. 30 at the Drury Lane Conference Center in Oakbrook Terrace, Ill., attendees can choose from 13 continuing education seminars. Learn more at http://alatoday.org.

Event: ArchitectureBoston Expo, Oct. 28-30

Representatives from Tubelite will be in SIGCO’s booth in Hall C at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center for ArchitectureBoston Expo 2014.

ABx Expo 2014 Hours

Tues., Oct. 28, 11 a.m- 6 p.m.
Wed., Oct. 29, 11 a.m- 6 p.m.
Thurs., Oct. 30, 11 a.m- 4 p.m.

Watch the ABx website for more information about the conference.

Tubelite adds 34000 Series storefront to ForceFront Storm hurricane resistant products

Tubelite_34000_T-Sample_webTubelite Inc. introduces 34000 Series storefront system as part of its ForceFront™ Storm products, engineered for hurricane resistance on low- to mid-rise commercial buildings. The 34000 Series has been tested to Florida Building Code TAS 201, 202 and 203 standards and are compliant with ASTM E 1886/1996 Wind Zone 4 impact/cyclic criteria. ForceFront medium stile entrance doors also were tested with 34000 Series storefront to provide a complete impact-resistant system.

Tubelite’s 34000 Series features a 2-1/2-by-5-inch flush-glazed system and impact-resistant screw-spline framing, glazed with 1-5/16-inch laminated glass positioned in the center of the frame. This new addition is offered as either a non-thermal E34000 Series system or as the T34000 Series with a single poured-and-debridged thermal improvement option. Both choices easily accommodate insulated glass.

Along with hurricane impact resistance and thermal performance, ForceFront medium stile entrance doors are designed for compliance with large and small missile impact, and for forced entry testing to meet AAMA 1304-02. The door stiles have a 4-inch profile width and a depth of 1-3/4-inch. The aluminum used to produce all of Tubelite’s ForceFront systems can be extruded using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Event: Design-Build, Oct. 6-8, Dallas

Tubelite returns to the Design-Build Institute of America’s (DBIA’s) Design-Build Conference & Expo in booth #227 at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel.

The DBIA is the only organization that defines, teaches and promotes best practices in design-build. Design-build is an integrated approach that delivers design and construction services under one contract with a single point of responsibility. Owners select design-build to achieve best value, while meeting schedule, cost and quality goals.

Event: CSI CONSTRUCT, Sept. 9-11

Tubelite returns to the Construction Specifications Institute’s (CSI’s) CONSTRUCT show, where it will be exhibiting in booth #748 at the Baltimore Convention Center.

CONSTRUCT is the only national trade show and educational conference for the commercial building teams that specify and source building products. This event is dedicated to institutional, industrial and commercial building industries.

Event: GlassBuild America, Sept. 9-11, Las Vegas

Tubelite returns as an exhibitor to GlassBuild America, Sept. 9-11 at Nevada’s Las Vegas Convention Center, booth #2263.

GlassBuild America is organized by the National Glass Association, in partnership with the Glass Association of North America, the American Architectural Manufacturers Association, the Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance and the Bath Enclosure Manufacturers Association.

Tubelite debuts 34000 Series storefront

0Tubelite_34000_CornerSampleTubelite introduces 34000 Series storefront system, engineered for hurricane resistance. This new product will be on display in booth #4634 at the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Convention and Expo 2014.

Tubelite’s new 34000 Series storefront is offered as either a non-thermal system or with a single poured-and-debridged thermal improvement option. Both choices easily accommodate insulated glass. Enhancing the product’s environmental attributes, the aluminum used to produce Tubelite’s storefront systems can be extruded using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Chicago’s Audi dealership showcases Tubelite’s curtainwall

1Tubelite_IL_Audi_ExteriorAudi Hoffman Estates dealership in Illinois showcases Tubelite’s 400 Series curtainwall and reflects the efficiency, performance, luxury and environmental themes of its vehicles. The new $9 million, 47,000-square-foot facility is one of the first in the Midwest to feature a square, metal-clad “terminal” prototype design by Munich-based Allmann Sattler Wappner Architekten.

In 1990, Audi Hoffman Estates became the first exclusive, stand-alone Audi dealership in the United States. In 2013, it also became one of the first new dealerships in the U.S. to use Allmann Sattler Wappner’s design. The Dobbins Group’s Chicago-based architectural team helped the Illinois dealership bring this prototype from concept to reality.

Celebrating Audi’s “Vorsprung durch Technik,” “Progress through Technology,” the dealership’s prototype reflects a corporate philosophy that “reminds us to challenge ourselves, rewrite the rules from time to time and always fuel our pioneering spirit.”

The terminal design gives the Audi a new identity throughout the world. It also increases dealers’ space to accommodate the growing range of cars, as well as the company’s market presence in international cities. These heterogeneous locations demand an architectural language with both a single consistent typology and a distinctive design. Developed as a modular system, the facility’s structural and spatial concept is flexible and scalable.

“It’s a very unique look,” observed Brian Hall, Audi Hoffman Estates’ general manager. “Audi is very demanding on all of their products and the way they’re installed, so it was not easy.”

Well-suited to the precise design, scale and metallic aesthetic of Audi’s dealership, Tubelite’s 400 Series curtainwall is engineered for low- and mid-rise applications. For Audi Hoffman Estates, Leopardo Companies served as the project’s general contractor. Glazing contractor Northern Glass Inc. specified and installed the curtainwall system on time and within budget.

Tubelite_IL_Audi_Ext-ParkingLot_web“First, Tubelite came in under my original design budget. What’s more, they were able to produce materials in a very timely manner,” said Eric Martinson, project manager and estimator with Northern Glass Inc. “Thanks to the Tubelite team, the entire process was a pleasant experience.”

The curtainwall features offers 2.5-inch sightlines and the strength of 8-inch-deep backmembers with an overall 10-inch system depth. Every other vertical was butt-glazed. Low-E insulating glass reduces solar heat gain in the summer and heat loss in winter – important in the Chicago climate. An exterior screw-applied pressure bar secures the glass.

The durable framework of the curtainwall provides exceptional structural performance, reducing the need for steel reinforcing. “Tubelite helped engineer the curtainwall, letting us know what size steel reinforcement was needed,” noted Martinson. “They also helped with some very difficult bends, located in the opposite top and bottom corners, and delivered all stock length material in a couple of weeks.”

The aluminum used to produce this curtainwall can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly finishes. Enhancing the project’s environmental attributes, longevity and metallic appearance, the aluminum framing was finished by Linetec using clear anodize, which contains no volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Because anodize is an integral part of the substrate, the coating delivers excellent wear and abrasion resistance with minimal maintenance. Anodize process by-products are recyclable and anodized aluminum is 100 percent recyclable.

“It’s got a lot of metal on the exterior for a very specific look,” added Audi Hoffman Estates’ Hall. “Everyone seems to love it. …and as for customers, they are all very impressed.”

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Audi Hoffman Estates, 1200 W. Golf Rd., Hoffman Estates, IL 60169; http://www.audihoffmanestates.com
* Owner: AUDI AG; Germany; Audi of America, http://www.audiusa.com/
* Architects: Allmann Sattler Wappner Architekten GmbH; Munich, Germany; http://www.allmannsattlerwappner.de;
The Dobbins Group; Chicago; http://www.dobbinsgroup.com/
* General Contractor: Leopardo Companies, Inc., Hoffman Estates, Illinois; http://leopardo.com
* Glazing Contractor: Northern Glass Inc.; Elk Grove Village, Illinois
* Entrance Systems – Manufacturer: Tubelite Inc.; Walker, Michigan; http://tubeliteinc.com
* Entrance Systems – Finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wisconsin; http://linetec.com/
* Photography: Leopardo Companies, Inc.
* Video: Leopardo Companies, Inc.; http://vimeo.com/77605308

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Tubelite adds Rene Buggs as director of HR

Rene Buggs joins Tubelite Inc. as director of human resources. As part of the executive leadership team, she reports to company president Amy Cole. Tubelite provides clients and their commercial building projects with storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems.Tubelite_ReneBuggs

Helping direct Tubelite’s strategic growth, Buggs works with all employees, supports organizational development and promotes talent acquisition. Current openings are available at all of Tubelite’s locations in Michigan, South Carolina and Texas, including the director engineering position.

“Our mission is to not only be the easiest and most dependable supplier for our client to partner with but also be the employer of choice,” explains Buggs. “Every day, our people deliver on this mission and uphold our strong reputation.”

Buggs brings extensive experience in human resources (HR) to Tubelite. She most recently served as senior employee relations manager at the Dean Foods’ corporate office in Dallas, where she has worked in many progressive HR roles for 12 years. During her time there, she had HR responsibility for five accounting centers in different locations. Her previous employment included working as a branch manager/officer and HR officer at Fifth Third Bank of Grand Rapids, Michigan.

A certified senior professional in HR, Buggs earned an undergraduate degree in business administration and management from Michigan’s Davenport University. She also received an MBA from Western Michigan University.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

TubeliteInc.com connects to BIM libraries, AIA/CES course menu, product specifications, performance data and more

Tubelite Inc. offers architects and other building team members on-demand, free access to Building Information Modeling (BIM) libraries, product specifications, performance data and other information on its entrances, windows, storefront framing, curtainwall, sun shades and light shelves. 3Tubelite_BIM2

From TubeliteInc.com, visitors can access Autodesk® Seek’s and CADdetails’ BIM libraries by clicking on the Products menu and following the links for either Product Types or Technical Data Index. The Technical Data Index also features CAD files, product details and specifications, test reports, windload charts, door hardware, glazing charts and installation instructions.

Further supporting the architectural community’s professional development needs, Tubelite’s associates deliver one-hour, in-person educational presentations available through the American Institute of Architects’ Continuing Education System (AIA/CES). Participants can receive 1.0 Learning Unit (LU) for each program and three of the courses are recognized for health, safety and welfare (HSW) credits.

Currently, Tubelite’s AIA/CES course menu includes:
* How to Select the Right Architectural Aluminum Product3Tubelite_BIM1
* The In’s and Out’s of Architectural Aluminum Doors and Frames
* Green: Architectural Aluminum Products
for Commercial Construction (HSW)
* What Are Modified and Custom Aluminum Doors
* Integrated Façade Design: Daylighting (HSW)
* Integrated Façade Design: U-Factors (HSW)

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Jim Flandreau serves as Tubelite’s director of IT

Tubelite_JimFlandreau_webTubelite Inc. announces Jim Flandreau as director of information technology (IT) business relationship management. Efficient IT practices further support Tubelite’s clients and their commercial building projects with storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems.

Flandreau serves Tubelite from its parent company, Apogee Enterprises, Inc. He brings more than 17 years of experience in IT strategic planning, governance and business process improvements, and in manufacturing operations. Throughout his career, he has focused on operational excellence in manufacturing, packaging and the supply chain.

Before his role at Apogee, he worked at L. Perrigo Company, a Michigan-based company and the largest manufacturer of private-label over-the-counter pharmaceuticals in the United States. Previous employers include SAP, as well as Procter & Gamble Co. and its Clairol division.

Flandreau earned a Bachelor of Science in engineering management from the United States Military Academy at West Point in New York. He also received an MBA from Ohio’s Xavier University – School of Business Administration.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Tubelite adds Tim McMenamin as Lean Champion

Tubelite_TMcMenaminTim McMenamin joins Tubelite Inc. as Lean Champion helping to drive efficiency and quality, improve productivity and optimize the company’s value stream. Tubelite provides clients and their commercial building projects with storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems.

Most recently, McMenamin applied his “Black Belt” in Six Sigma/Lean manufacturing at E&J Gallo Winery and previously served as a team leader managing several bottling production lines. He began his career in Michigan’s automotive production industry as a project design leader with the General Motors’ Chevrolet Avalanche launch team. He also worked as a production supervisor at Ford Sterling Axle Plant, as Daimler Chrysler’s production team leader in the final assembly of Dodge Ram and Dakota trucks, and as a production supervisor for American Axle & Manufacturing Holdings, Inc.

McMenamin earned a bachelor’s degree with a focus on supply chain/logistics from Davenport University-Eastern Region in Dearborn, Michigan.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Oklahoma’s high school features new performing arts facility and academic wing with Tubelite’s systems

Tubelite is exhibiting at AIA Expo in booth #4634

Charles Davis Smith, AIA, architectural photographer; DallasBefore Oklahoma’s Broken Arrow Public Schools renovated and expanded South Intermediate High School, nearly 200 classrooms throughout the district were in portable buildings. Students and educators were in dire need of permanent space. Upgrading the facility, the $9.4 million project renovated 9,800 square feet and added approximately 33,700 square feet of space. Tubelite’s storefront, curtainwall and entrance systems help convey a sense of connectedness across the large campus, while offering outside views and natural daylight.

South Intermediate High School’s extensive makeover was designed by Perkins+Will. Oklahoma-based Selser Schaefer Architects assisted in reinventing the school’s single-story Modern architecture. Ideal for low-rise applications with contemporary aesthetics, Tubelite’s T14000 Series Storefront, 400 Series Curtainwall and seven, Wide Stile doors were used throughout the campus’ renovation and addition.

Architectural Glass and Metal, Inc. installed more than 390 linear feet of Tubelite’s products, under the guidance of CMS Willowbrook who served as general contractor. South Intermediate High School remained open throughout construction of the project, which started in September 2011 and continued through December 2012. Today, the high school actively serves 1,400 students in grades 9 to 12.

A simple planning strategy was used to integrate the school’s existing structures with the expansion. The design created a courtyard that can be used for impromptu outdoor theatrical plays, as a pre-function space for basketball games, as a space for art projects, or for large all-school assemblies. “The courtyard gives the school a new identity. Visual and layered connections between arts and athletics facilitate a blended approach to community and education,” said Perkins+Will’s principal and k-12 regional practice leader, Patrick Glenn, AIA, REFP, LEED® AP.

Charles Davis Smith, AIA, architectural photographer; DallasOriented to capture indirect northern daylight, the courtyard provides deep overhangs to block the western and southern sun, while allowing for eastern morning light in the new art room. The art room is part of a massive, 33,700-square-foot multi-faceted performing arts addition. This addition was substantially complete in December 2012. Along with the art room, it houses a centralized theater, media center, art gallery, band hall, orchestra room and a choir rehearsal hall.

Oklahoma limestone topped with a sleek metal panel eyebrow and canopy denotes the performing arts center’s entry. According to Glenn, Tubelite’s products were used extensively throughout the performing arts facility addition. He noted, “Layering a sequence of spaces – outdoor to indoor and protected to open – promotes a hierarchy of arrival and gathering. The design provides a transparent wrapper crafting an indoor/outdoor destination and concentration for arts and the community. The pre-function lobby provides openness and transparency to the courtyard, while becoming a beacon for evening community events.”

On the new academic wing, large amounts of clear glazing continue to promote transparency from indoor to outdoor space. The space includes six state-of-the-art science classrooms, computer labs, administration areas and a teacher planning area. Brick masonry, light-colored exterior plaster and dark bronze anodize on the storefront, curtainwall and entrance systems’ aluminum framing complement the existing architecture.

Supporting educational facilities’ sustainability goals, the aluminum used to produce these systems’ framing can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content composition. Building upon these environmental attributes, Linetec’s eco-friendly anodize process sends 90 percent less waste to landfills than traditional anodizing. These durable architectural-grade finishes help minimize maintenance and meet the rigorous performance expectations of high school.

The project’s enduring and outstanding design earned a 2013 Built: Design Award from the American Institute of Architects’ Dallas, the chapter’s highest recognition of excellence.

“This project was a joint effort between the architects who brought their design skills to the table for conversations with the teachers and other end users of the facility,” said Michelle Bergwall, chief operating officer for operational services for Broken Arrow Public Schools. “The result is a building that is both beautiful and practical for daily operations.”

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South Intermediate High School, 301 W. New Orleans St., Broken Arrow, OK 74012
* Owner: Broken Arrow Public Schools; Broken Arrow, Oklahoma; http://www.baschools.org
* Architect: Perkins+Will; Dallas; http://www.perkinswill.com/
* Assisting Architect: Selser Schaefer Architects; Tulsa, Oklahoma; http://www.selserschaefer.com/
* General Contractor: CMS Willowbrook; Oklahoma City; http://www.cmswillowbrook.com/
* Glazing Contractor: Architectural Glass & Metal, Inc.; Alma, Arkansas; http://archglassmetal.com/
* Entrance Systems – Manufacturer: Tubelite Inc.; Walker, Michigan; http://tubeliteinc.com
* Entrance Systems – Finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wisconsin; http://linetec.com/
* Photography: Charles Davis Smith, AIA, architectural photographer; Dallas

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

 

Event: AIA Expo, June 26-28, Chicago

Tubelite Inc. will be at the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Expo 2014 in booth #4634. It is one of more than 700 exhibitors at Chicago’s McCormick Place.

AIA Expo 2014 Hours

Thurs., June 26, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Fri., June 27, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Sat., June 28, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

For more than 150 years, members of AIA have worked with each other and their communities to create more valuable, healthy, secure and sustainable buildings and cityscapes. Members adhere to a code of ethics and professional conduct to ensure the highest standards in professional practice. Embracing their responsibility to serve society, AIA members engage civic and government leaders and the public in helping find needed solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world.

Event: AIA Wisconsin, May 7-8, Madison

Tubelite returns to the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Wisconsin’s Convention & Building Products Expo. This year’s event will be held in Madison on May 7-8.

Register before April 25 for discounted rate. Online registration forms and additional information can be found at http://www.aiaw.org/convention/.

Tubelite’s Michigan facility expands extrusion capacity, offers larger and more complex shapes

At its facility in Reed City, Mich., Tubelite Inc. has increased production capacity, as well as its aluminum extrusion capabilities, offering larger and more complex shapes for storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems. These improvements were accomplished with the addition of a third aluminum extrusion press and the application of Lean manufacturing principles.

Tubelite_MI_Capacity1“The successful integration of Press 3 required a company-wide effort – from equipment acquisition in late 2012 through production-capable operations as of March 1, 2014,” says Tubelite’s vice president of operations, Glen Barfknecht. “This is a great example of the dramatic results that can be achieved using Lean to drive continuous improvement year-over-year.”

Leading these continuous improvement efforts in Reed City, Barfknecht recognizes an entire team effort, but identifies four key Tubelite associates:
* Eric Ziegler, Process Engineer
* Bill Martin, Process Engineer III
* Dave Carr, Maintenance Technician
* David Smith, Maintenance Supervisor

Tubelite_MI_Capacity2“Working with the four walls of our 245,000-square-foot facility, we reclaimed underused storage space to house Press 3. This not only has allowed us to be productive, but also more efficient. We are maximizing our use of materials and space, and minimizing waste,” says Martin.

Barfknecht agrees and adds, “Our production throughput has doubled and our aluminum billet recovery has improved. We regularly invest in technological automation, upgrades and training. We are optimizing our employees’ time and efforts by building upon our existing best practices for safety, quality and delivery. We remain dedicated to providing customers with the industry’s most dependable, on-time delivery and personalize customer service. Supporting our success and growth, we anticipate increased employment opportunities in Reed City and throughout our company.”

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Event: CSI Red River Valley, April 10, Fargo, N.D.

On April 10, Tubelite will be participating in the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) Red River Valley Chapter Product Showcase in Fargo, N.D.

Event: Great Lakes Renaissance Symposium, May 9, Cleveland

On May 9 in Cleveland, Tubelite representatives will be at the Great Lakes Renaissance Symposium on High-Performing Building Enclosures. The event’s hosts are the Building Enclosure Council (BEC) Cleveland and the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Cleveland chapter.

Register before April 16 for the best pricing. Click here to learn more.

Event: CSI Gulf States Regional Conference, May 16-17, New Orleans

On May 16-17, Tubelite will be at the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) Gulf States Regional Conference in New Orleans. The conference site is the Four Points Sheraton in the French Quarter.

Register before April 11 for discounted rate. Online registration forms and additional information can be found here.

Tubelite names Mike Peters and Kelly Townsend as client development managers

Tubelite Inc. adds Mike Peters and Kelly Townsend as client development managers. Both have been hired to replace their recently retired predecessors and will be working closely with Tubelite customers and architects to provide assistance with storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems. Peters replaces Steve Seeling in serving clients in Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri. Townsend assumes the responsibilities of Don Walker for clients in Oklahoma and northern Texas.
Tubelite_MikePeters_web
Peters joins Tubelite following nine years of owning and operating his own business as an independent sales representative serving EFCO’s customers in Oklahoma and Kansas. He began his career in 1989 with EFCO as a field service technician and progressed to become a field service manager.

To gain additional industry knowledge, Peters left EFCO after 13 years and accepted a position with a glazing contractor in Ohio where he led their service division. He transitioned to Vistawall Architectural Products (now Oldcastle Building Envelope) to become the company’s sales representative in Ohio, before starting his own firm.

Tubelite_KellyTownsendTownsend draws from more than three decades of experience in the commercial glazing and architectural products industries, as well as a lifetime of connections in Texas. He most recently worked as a Wausau Window and Wall Systems’ Texas-based architectural sales representative.

Prior to joining Wausau, he held the position of national sales director of Columbia Commercial Building Products in Rockwall, Texas. Previous positions include working as an estimating manager and as a senior project manager for Vistawall Architectural, as vice president of field operations at Alco Glass in Mesquite, Texas; and as a project foreman at Haley-Greer, Inc.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Event: CSI Middle Atlantic Region Conference, April 3-6

Tubelite’s architectural specification manager Tom Minnon will present “Integrated Façade Design – Daylighting” at the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) Middle Atlantic Region Conference. Presentation attendees have the opportunity to earn 1.0 Learning Unit (LU) for health, safety and welfare (HSW).

With nearly four decades of industry experience, Minnon is a LEED® Accredited Professional by the U.S. Green Building Council and a Certified FenestrationMaster™ by the American Architectural Manufacturers Association.

The conference will be held April 3-6 at the Crown Plaza Hampton-Marina Hotel in Hampton, Va. The event schedule, registration details and more can be found at http://tidewater.csinet.org/

Event: CSI South Central Region, April 3-4

Tubelite representatives will participate in the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) South Central Region Conference/Tradeshow, April 3-4 in Austin, Texas. Register and learn more at http://www.scr-csi.org/9-news/13-scr-region-event

Event: Buffalo Future Green Trends Workshop, March 27

On March 27, Tubelite’s architectural specification manager Tom Minnon will present on daylighting at the Future Green Trends workshop in Buffalo, N.Y. The workshop is being provided by DPC Continuing Education, Inc., and will be held at the Buffalo-Amherst Holiday Inn.

Minnon and Daryl Bertollini, architectural sales representative for Syracuse Glass, will meet with attending architects at the companies’ tabletop display.

Additional information on the event and registration forms are available at http://www.dpcceinc.com/event_pages/14-03-27_ep.html

Event: Glass TEXpo, April 10-11, San Antonio

During Glass TEXpo™ 2014, April 10-11 at the Wyndham San Antonio Riverwalk Hotel, Tubelite welcomes visitors to booth #74.

On April 10, Tubelite’s architectural specification manager Tom Minnon will be a panelist at Glass TEXpo’s “Daylighting, Integrated Façade Design and Energy Efficient Buildings” event, held 9-10:15 a.m. Discounted registration is available until March 28 at http://www.usglassmag.com/texpo/

Co-sponsored by the Texas Glass Association and USGlass magazine, USGNN and Window Film magazine.

Event: CSI Central Pennsylvania, March 19

On March 19, Tubelite’s architectural specification manager Tom Minnon will speak at the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) Central Pennsylvania’s 39th Annual Exhibitors’ Show at the Radisson Hotel in Camp Hill. He plans to present on “Integrated Façade Design – Daylighting.”

Minnon will be joined by George Rand, Tubelite’s client development manager serving the area. Tubelite also will have a tabletop display at the exposition. Learn more at http://www.cpc-csi.org/.

Event: CSI Duluth/Twin Ports, March 11

On March 11, Tubelite participated in the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) Twin Port Chapter’s Product Showcase in Duluth, Minn. Read more at http://twinports.csinet.org/.

Amy Cole named President of Tubelite Inc.

Tubelite_AmyColeAmy Cole has been named president of Tubelite Inc., a leading manufacturer and supplier of architectural aluminum storefront, entrance and curtainwall systems in the United States. She joins Tubelite on March 31 and will report to Joseph F. Puishys, chief executive officer of Apogee Enterprises, Inc., parent company of Tubelite.

“Amy brings more than 25 years experience in the construction industry, as an executive leading sales, marketing, manufacturing and engineering,” said Puishys. “She has successfully grown businesses by implementing innovative strategies, while meeting business objectives.”

Most recently, Cole was general manager, residential/light commercial business at Kohler Power Systems, Kohler, Wis. From 1988 to 2012, she was with Hilti North America, a world leader in developing, manufacturing and marketing construction-related products and systems for the construction industry and building maintenance. She had positions of increasing responsibility at Hilti, her last as senior vice president, channels Hilti North America, where she led customer service, distributor and rental channels, and retail marketing.

Tubelite_KenWerbowyShe is succeeding Ken Werbowy, who is retiring after 20 years as president of Tubelite.  “I congratulate Ken on his retirement from Tubelite, which has seen outstanding growth under his leadership since Apogee acquired the company in 2007,” said Puishys. “I am pleased that Apogee will continue to benefit from Ken’s deep industry knowledge as he supports Apogee’s corporate development efforts on a part-time basis.”

Cole has an MBA in finance from the University of Tulsa, Okla., and a bachelor’s degree in romance languages from Colorado College, Colorado Springs.

About Tubelite Inc.
Tubelite was established in 1945 and is part of Apogee Enterprises, Inc. The company’s headquarters, distribution, warehousing and assembly operations are in Walker, Mich. It also has distribution, warehousing and assembly operations in Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas, and aluminum extrusion operations in Reed City, Mich.

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Event: CSI Cincinnati, March 12

On March 12, Tubelite’s architectural specification manager Tom Minnon will present on performance glazing and “Integrated Façade Design – Daylighting” at the Construction Specifications Institute’s (CSI) Cincinnati 35th Annual Products Showcase. Tubelite also will have a tabletop display at the exposition.

Minnon will be joined by Joe Fleming, Tubelite’s client development manager serving Ohio. They are scheduled to speak 4-5 p.m. at the Sharonville Convention Center. There is no cost to participate, but attendees are asked to register online at http://www.csicincinnati.org/registration-cps.php

Event: CSI Nashville, March 11

On March 11, Tubelite architectural specification manager Tom Minnon will be a featured speaker at the Specheads Lunch and Learn Series, hosted by Construction Specifications Institute’s (CSI) Nashville Chapter.

The presentation on “Integrated Façade Design – Daylighting” will be at Southland Design Center, 667 Wedgewood Ave. Lunch and networking begins at 11:30 a.m. and the presentation is scheduled at 12-1 p.m. Attendees have the opportunity to earn 1.0 Learning Unit (LU) for health, safety and welfare (HSW). Reserve a seat by March 7 at http://www.csinashville.org/ or email rsvp@csinashville.org.

Minnon will be joined by representatives from G. Bowie and Associates, http://gbowieandassoc.com/. With nearly four decades of industry experience, Minnon is a LEED® Accredited Professional by the U.S. Green Building Council and a Certified FenestrationMaster™ by the American Architectural Manufacturers Association. G. Bowie & Associates represents the top manufacturers of architectural building products, and specializes in Division 8 products, historic, new construction, retrofit and interior design.

Event: CSI Minneapolis, Feb. 24

On Feb. 24, Tubelite participated in the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) Minneapolis-St. Paul Chapter’s Product Showcase. Representatives met with attendees and discussed their commercial glazing needs including storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

Tubelite grows Southeastern regional team

Tubelite_TimDoughtyTubelite Inc. has promoted Tim Doughty to Southeastern regional sales manager. Focusing on Louisiana and Mississippi, Keith Hocutt has been hired as a client development manager. Both work closely with architects and glazing contractors to provide assistance with storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

With more than 30 years of industry experience, Doughty will continue his role as client development manager for Tubelite’s clients in Georgia with the addition of managing the sales representatives of four other territories. He has been closely involved with projects requiring protection from the region’s solar heat, humidity and hurricanes. Meeting these high-performance needs, he helped introduce Tubelite’s ForceFront™ Storm storefront and entrance products throughout the area.

BasTubelite_KeithHocutted in Mississippi, Hocutt joins Tubelite with nearly 15 years of experience in the industry. He recently worked at YKK AP America, Inc. as an architectural sales representative in the Southeast. Previously, he was an outside sales representative at ARCH Aluminum and Glass Co., Inc.

Prior to beginning his career in architectural aluminum and fenestration products, Hocutt served as a squad leader at the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center. He earned an Army Accommodation Medal for Meritorious Service while serving in a leadership role at the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) and Good Conduct Medals for each of his three tours of duty. He holds a bachelor’s degree in management from Mississippi’s Bellhaven University.

Both Doughty and Hocutt are known for industry knowledge and their consultative approach. They frequently present continuing educational courses to architects and other building professionals. Tubelite Inc. currently offers programs approved by the American Institute of Architects (AIA/CES).

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Event: GANA BEC, March 16-18, Las Vegas

Tubelite will be participating in the Glass Association of North America‘s Building Envelope Contractors Division (GANA BEC) conference, March 16-18 in Las Vegas.

GANA strives to provide members with premiere educational programs, publications, networking opportunities, meetings and conventions. The BEC is comprised of glazing contractors and suppliers to the contract glazing industry.

Tubelite’s Mary Olivier and Tom Minnon promoted, Jim Oberlin joins the Eastern/Midwestern regional sales team

Tubelite Inc. has promoted Mary Olivier to marketing Tubelite_MaryOlivierdirector. Reporting to Olivier, Tom Minnon has been promoted to architectural specification manager. Jim Oberlin has been hired to fill Minnon’s previous role as Eastern/Midwestern regional sales manager providing consultative support regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

Most recently, Olivier served as Tubelite’s marketing manager and has worked at the company for seven years. As marketing director, she manages Tubelite’s architectural specification and continuing education, public relations, advertising, sponsorships and trade show exhibitions, as well as the website and price book.

Tubelite_TomMinnonWith nearly four decades of industry experience, Minnon has earned many professional accreditations including LEED® Accredited Professional through the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and Certified FenestrationMaster™ through the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA). He readily shares his knowledge with architects, specifiers and all those involved with design and construction. Earlier this year, he presented at the national Construction Specification Institute’s (CSI) CONSTRUCT show and represented Tubelite at GlassBuild America and at the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

Tubelite_JimOberlinIn addition to leading the Eastern and Midwestern sales team, Oberlin regularly meets with architects and glazing contractors to assist with their current projects’ commercial glazing needs. He joins Tubelite from Oldcastle Building Envelope and draws from nearly 30 years of industry experience. Along with his professional and practical insights from the field, his educational background includes a bachelor’s degree in finance.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Greenbuild 2013 Show Report

United States Green Building Council’s national conference was held Nov 20-21 in historic Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Client Development Managers George Rand & Fred Haas, joined Marketing Director Mary Olivier and Promotions Coordinator Walt Lutzke to meet with attendees and connect them with the Tubelite products and solutions for their sustainable building product requirements. Tubelite’s sister company Wausau Window & Wall Systems also exhibited and we are following up with requests and comments from architects and other visitors to our booths.

Greenbuild 1

Greenbuild 3

DBIA Tradeshow Report

Design Build Institute of America’s national conference was held Nov 4 – 6 in Las Vegas at The Mirage Resort & Casino. Architectural Sales Rep John Priebe and Marketing Promotions Coordinator Walt Lutzke were present to meet with attendees and connect them with the Tubelite products and solutions to meet their needs. This was the DBIA’s 20th anniversary and speakers Cal Ripken, Jr. and Sugar Ray Leonard delighted record crowds. Tubelite’s sister company Wausau Window & Wall Systems also exhibited, and we are looking forward to DBIA’s 2014 conference in Dallas, TX on October 6 – 8.

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Glen Barfknecht named as Tubelite’s VP of operations

Tubelite_GlenBarfknechtTubelite Inc. has appointed Glen Barfknecht to the position of vice president of operations. Based at the company’s headquarters in Grand Rapids, Mich., he is part of the executive team and reports to Tubelite’s president, Ken Werbowy.

Werbowy praises Barfknecht’s early involvement saying, “Since Chuck Pope’s retirement in mid-May, Glen has been instrumental in helping lead our operational efforts. As a result, he has gained a solid familiarity with many of Tubelite’s operations, our facilities in Michigan and Texas, and our team members.”

Barfknecht joins Tubelite from its parent company, Apogee Enterprises, Inc., where he served as director of operational excellence. He draws from 28 years of experience working in a variety of senior operations management roles within several large corporations including Pentair, Reviva and Progress Energy.

Previously located in Minnesota, Barfknecht received an M.B.A. from the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, and an undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Event: USGBC Greenbuild, Nov. 20-22, Philadelphia

Tubelite returns to U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC’s) Greenbuild International Conference & Expo, exhibiting in booth #430 at the Philadelphia Convention Center.

Exhibition Hours:
Wed., Nov. 20, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Expo Hall Open
Thurs., Nov. 21, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m., Expo Hall Open

The UGBC’s Greenbuild International Conference & Expo convenes the industry’s largest gathering of representatives from all sectors of the green building movement. Three days of extensive educational programming, workshops, a vast exhibition floor and ample networking events provide unrivaled opportunities to learn about the latest technological innovations, explore new products, and exchange ideas with other professionals. Greenbuild is the four-time recipient of IMEX Green Meetings Award.

The USGBC is committed to a prosperous and sustainable future through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. USGBC works toward its mission of market transformation through its LEED green building certification program, robust educational offerings, a nationwide network of chapters and affiliates, the annual Greenbuild International Conference & Expo, and advocacy in support of public policy that encourages and enables green buildings and communities.

Event: ArchitectureBoston Expo, Nov. 19-21

Representatives from Tubelite will be in SIGCO’s booth #436 in Hall C at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center for ArchitectureBoston Expo 2013. Watch the ABx website for more information about the conference.

Shared Learnings: FenestrationMaster

by Tom Minnon, CFM, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

This month, I am proud to add Certified FenestrationMaster (CFM) to the list of certifications, accreditations and accomplishments I’ve gained during my 38 years of experience in this ever-changing industry. I am one of the first people to earn this certification through AAMA’s FenestrationMasters™ program.

FenestrationAssociate is offered for entry-level certification and is available to all. FenestrationMaster is the advanced level and requires the candidate to have either six years fenestration product-related experience, or a four-year degree in engineering, architecture or applied sciences plus four years of industry experience. Those who choose to enroll in the program receive a Candidate Guide, Study Notebook and three-month access to AAMA’s Study Resource Center with read-only access to AAMA documents referenced in the courses.

While I may have been qualified as a candidate for the advanced-level certification, I still needed to do my homework and successfully complete the 32 in-depth, online courses. These include:

Group 1
• Window Selection
• Glass Selection
• Requirements of NAFS-08 Standard (and variances from earlier editions)
• Specialty Tests (blast, impact, tornado, acoustics)

Group 2
• Profile Performance and Material Considerations
• Coatings and Finishes

Group 3
• Hardware, Weatherstrip and Weatherseals
• Sealants and Adhesives Used during Factory Fabrication

Group 4
• Code Requirements
• History of the I-Codes & Current Requirements
• AAMA Certification and I-Code Compliance
• Special Code Requirements: ADA, WOCD, fire safety, safety glazing
• Energy Efficiency and Thermal Performance
• ICC energy code requirements and Energy Star requirements
• Thermal Performance Certification versus Testing
• Skylights for Daylighting

Group 5
• Installation
• Commercial Installation Standard Practice
• Residential Installation
• Flashing
• Field Testing and Forensic Evaluation
• Fenestration Anchorage

Group 6
• Aluminum Curtain Wall Design
• Aluminum Storefronts and Entrances
• Energy and the Architectural Fenestration Industry

Since I have been involved in commercial fenestration most of my career, it was challenging to learn some of the courses that involved PVC and fiberglass windows, residential installation standards and anchorage.

Once I finished the coursework and spent several hours studying the material, I felt prepared and completed the exam. The final exam must be completed at an official testing center or using AAMA-authorized proctor. The test itself was straightforward and I felt confident about the results. If a candidate fails, they are encouraged to brush up on their studies and retake the test. They have up to three attempts in 12 months to pass the exam.

For me, scheduling the exam was probably the most difficult task. As my years of experience add up, so too do my professional responsibilities. I’m proud to be part of a company that continues to grow and thrive, especially in light of the economic climate. As the company expands its products, its locations and its knowledge, we continue to keep our customers as the top priority.

As I consider my commitments for the New Year, I must say good-bye for now. Thank you to Key Communications for the opportunity, to those who took the time to comment or email me, and to all of you who took the time to read. It’s been a pleasure to share this last year with you.

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Tubelite_TomMinnonTom Minnon, CFM, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Tubelite expands ForceFront Storm hurricane impact-resistant products

Expanding its ForceFront™ Storm hurricane impact-resistant products, Tubelite Inc. introduces E44000 Series storefront and entrance systems. Together, they provide a complete impact-resistant system that is easy to fabricate and install.
Tubelite_E44000
Tubelite’s E44000 Series’ non-thermal hurricane-impact storefront is a 2.5-by-5-inch flush-glazed, system for use on first floor, single-span applications in impact areas. This impact-resistant, screw-spline framing is prepared for glazing with 9/16-inch laminated glass positioned in the center of the frame. This storefront system meets the requirements High Velocity Hurricane Zone (HVHZ) Windzone 4 with large missile impact, (ASTM E 1886-05/E 1996-09 TAS 201).

Complementing the storefront system, ForceFront medium stile entrance doors are designed for compliance with HVHZ Windzone 3 with large missile impact (ASTM E 1886-05/E 1996-09). They also are tested to meet the American Architectural Manufacturers Association’s specification, AAMA 1304-02, for forced entry resistance.

The aluminum used to produce Tubelite’s ForceFront Storm systems can be extruded using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Event: Design-Build, Nov. 4-6, Las Vegas

Tubelite returns to the Design-Build Institute of America’s (DBIA’s) Design-Build Conference & Expo in booth #819 at the Mirage, Las Vegas.

Exhibit Hall Hours:
Mon., Nov. 4, 4:30 – 6:30 p.m., Exhibit Hall Opening Reception
Tues., Nov. 5, 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m., Exhibit Hall Luncheon; 4:15 – 6:15 p.m., Exhibit Hall Networking Reception
Wed., Nov. 6, 11:30 a.m. – 1:45 p.m., Exhibit Hall Luncheon

The DBIA is the only organization that defines, teaches and promotes best practices in design-build. Design-build is an integrated approach that delivers design and construction services under one contract with a single point of responsibility. Owners select design-build to achieve best value, while meeting schedule, cost and quality goals.

CONSTRUCT 2013 Conference and Tradeshow

Tom Minnon, John Priebe and Walt Lutzke represented Tubelite Inc. at this year’s event sponsored by the Construction Specification Institute. Attended by the country’s leading architectural specifiers and product manufacturer’s, the show was held at Music City Center in Nashville, TN. The newly opened convention center also showcased Tubelite doors and storefront on the interior meeting rooms.Tubelite’s display included TU24000 high performance thermal storefront framing, and previewed the E44000 impact resistant non-thermal storefront framing system. Tom Minnon’s presentation on “Daylighting and Integrated Façade Design” was well received during Friday’s CONSTRUCT Learning Pavillion.

Baltimore, MD is host city for next year’s show, and we are looking forward to exhibiting there.
CONSTRUCT - Nashville - Sep2013 001
CONSTRUCT - Nashville - Sep2013 004CONSTRUCT - Nashville - Sep2013 003

Event: Glass Expo Midwest, Oct. 31-Nov. 1, Chicago

Tubelite will be exhibiting at the Glass Expo Midwest, Oct. 31, 3-8 p.m. and Nov. 1, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., at Illinois’ Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel.

Co-sponsored by the Illinois Glazing Association, the Indiana, Ohio, Minnesota and Wisconsin Glass Associations, Detroit Glass Dealers Association, the Association of Glazing Contractors and USGlass magazine, USGNN and Window Film magazine. Members of the co-sponsoring associations and subscribers of USGlass and Window Film magazines who register by Oct. 25, 2013, will receive a free attendee registration (a $79 value) at no charge.

On Oct. 31, attendees of Fenestration Day also will receive the added benefit of having the ability to walk the Glass Expo Midwest show floor.

 

Music City Center welcomes CSI convention attendees through Tubelite’s doors

TL MCC DoubleTubelite is exhibiting at CSI 2013 Booth #343

Opened in May 2013, the new $585 million Music City Center (MCC) in Nashville hosts the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) annual convention and CONSTRUCT Show. Unlike most convention centers’ “box with docks” design, MCC showcases a glass and limestone exterior highlighting natural light, outside views and open corridors with more than 1,000 doors. Helping achieve this transparency and connection to surrounding spaces, Tubelite Inc. provided storefront and entrance systems that were installed by Nashville-based Alexander Metals, Inc.

Spanning 1.2 million square feet, MCC has been called a “wide-scraper” as it stretches 19 acres and six city blocks. It offers 353,143-square-foot exhibit space with multiple flex space, 90,000 square feet of meeting rooms/break-out space, a guitar-shaped 57,000-square-foot ballroom with built-in stage, and an 18,000-square-foot junior ballroom.

Musical motifs permeate the facility. Nashville’s music and entertainment industry has a $10 billion annual economic impact on the region. Recognizing the economic and cultural importance, the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and more than 100 custom art installation also are displayed inside the MCC.

CSI CONSTRUCT attendees are among the many who will experience the facility’s amenities. The Nashville Convention & Visitors Bureau has booked 123 trade shows or conventions at the new center and more than 1 million hotel room nights, a list that extends to 2026. Hotels and other commercial real estate in the surrounding area have responded with new construction and renovation projects to attract arriving visitors.

Inspiring the building boom, MCC’s design team includes tvsdesign of Atlanta with Tuck-Hinton Architects and Moody-Nolan, Inc., both of Nashville. “There is a lot of love, care, heart and soul that have gone into this project from all three firms, the construction team and the mayor,” said one of the project’s principal architects at tvsdesign, C. Andrew McLean, FAIA. “We all wanted to create a landmark that would not only make Nashville proud, but also reflect the unique culture of the area.”

In keeping with the city’s commitment to sustainable development, the MCC is committed to LEED® Silver certification through the U.S. Green Building Council. Contributing to the project’s green goals, the aluminum used to produce Tubelite’s 8-foot-tall monumental doors and storefront systems was extruded using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes.

TL MCC SingleSupporting the MCC’s indoor air quality control plan requiring the use of low-emitting volatile organic compounds (VOCs), Tubelite’s aluminum framing was finished by Linetec using clear anodize, which uses no VOCs. Because it is an integral part of the substrate, the anodic coating results in a hard, durable substance providing excellent wear and abrasion resistance with minimal maintenance. Anodize process by-products are recyclable and anodized aluminum is 100% recyclable.

“We wanted to not only make this a landmark structure for Nashville, but we also wanted to show a deep respect for the Tennessee environment,” said tvsdesign’s Kevin Gordon, AIA, LEED AP, another of the project’s principal architects.

From top to bottom, MCC focuses on environmental considerations. The facility is capped with 175,000-square-foot vegetative roof with 845 photovoltaic panels. A key design element, the roof is described as undulating “to represent the rolling hills of Tennessee and the sound waves that can be overheard by musicians playing in clubs on Broadway, at the Grand Ole Opry or Schermerhorn Center.”

Located in the heart of downtown Nashville, the convention center took 3.5 years to construct due in part to its scale and complex geometry, and also to a devastating flood that hit the city in May 2010. (A time-lapse video of the construction can be viewed at http://www.tennessean.com/section/projects07.) More than 7,300 people worked on the project’s construction and completed the project one week ahead of schedule in April 2013.

Leading the effort, general contractor Bell/Clark’s joint venture team is comprised of Bell & Associates Construction, LP, of Brentwood, Tenn., and Clark Construction Group, LLC, in association with Harmony Construction Group, LLC, of Nashville. Additional Nashville-based project partners include Ross Bryan & Associates and Logan Patri Engineering, structural engineers; I.C. Thomasson Associates Inc., and ECS mechanical engineers; and Barge Waggoner Sumner and Cannon, Inc., civil engineers.

“The entire project and construction management team and all the subcontractors and suppliers have proven their commitment to the project and the city of Nashville throughout the last three years, giving us regular updates that validated our confidence in them,” said Convention Center Authority chair, Marty Dickens. “They have done an outstanding job.”

“I applaud the project management team and its crew for finishing construction of the Music City Center ahead of their deadline,” Mayor Karl Dean also stated. “It is no small feat to finish construction on time, but to do so for a project of this scale is truly remarkable.

In May, MCC’s grand opening celebrations took place with a concert headlined by Sheryl Crow. In June, the project was honored with an Excellence in Building Green at the Governor’s Environmental Stewardship awards from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. In July, it was named the winner of the Greater Nashville Hospitality Association’s Associate Award of Excellence. In August, the facility’s architectural team proudly joined their colleagues at the AIA Tennessee Convention and Exhibition held at MCC.TL MCC WallCrop

“I continue to be impressed by the size and beauty of the Music City Center,” Dean said. “There’s no doubt we are a city with momentum, and with the opening of the Music City Center… even more tourists and conventioneers will get to see that first hand. We know it’s not going to be the biggest convention facility in the country, but I’m absolutely certain it will be the best.”

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Music City Center; G, 150 4th Ave N #250G, Nashville, TN  37219; http://www.nashvillemusiccitycenter.com/
* Owner: Convention Center Authority, Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County; Nashville, Tenn.; http://www.nashvilleconventionctr.com
* Architect: tvsdesign; Atlanta; http://www.tvsa.com
with Tuck-Hinton Architects; Nashville, Tenn.
and Moody-Nolan, Inc.; Nashville, Tenn.
* General contractor: Bell/Clark joint venture team of
Bell & Associates Construction, LP; Brentwood, Tenn.;
Clark Construction Group, LLC; http://www.clarkconstruction.com/
in association with Harmony Construction Group, LLC; Nashville, Tenn.;
* Glazing contractor: Alexander Metals, Inc.; Nashville, Tenn.; http://www.alexandermetalsinc.com
* Entrance systems  – manufacturer: Tubelite Inc.; Walker, Mich.; http://www.tubeliteinc.com
* Entrance systems  – glass fabricator: Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope; Santa Monica, Calif.; http://www.oldcastlebe.com/
* Entrance systems  – finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wis.; http://www.linetec.com
* Construction Specifications Institute: http://www.csinet.org/
* CONSTRUCT Show: http://www.constructshow.com/

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

 

Event: ALA Chicago Architecture Product Show, Oct. 22

Tubelite will be exhibiting at the Association of Licensed Architects (ALA) 15th Annual Chicago Architecture Conference and Product Show in booth #210 on Oct. 22 at the Drury Lane Conference Center.

The ALA is an organization open to all architects and professions related to architecture. It represents architects registered or licensed in any state, territory or possession of the United States or foreign country. ALA was founded in 1999 by architects who previously served as board members of other architects’ associations. Shortly thereafter, the Illinois Society of Architects (ISA), the oldest independent state organization in the country, combined efforts with ALA, bringing respected expertise and historic significance to the association.

Event: West Michigan Design and Construction Expo, Oct. 17, Grand Rapids

Tubelite will be exhibiting at the Builders Exchange of Michigan’s West Michigan Design and Construction Expo, Oct. 17, 12:30-5 p.m., at the DeltaPlex Arena, Grand Rapids.

Highlighting the theme of “collaboration,” the Expo is co-hosted with Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) Grand Rapids Chapter.

The Builders Exchange of Michigan is a member-owned organization that was formed in 1885. Its primary mission is to provide news on construction activity in the state of Michigan. The Exchange is overseen by a board of directors elected from the membership.

The Grand Rapids Chapter of the CSI represents an organization that strives to serve the western Michigan construction community. CSI members represent a diverse group of individuals from architects, engineers, contractors, product suppliers and representatives, owners, distributors, construction managers and also specifiers. The Grand Rapids Chapter of CSI has been active in the western Michigan area since 1967.

Tubelite honored among the industry’s “Best Companies to Work For”

U.S. Glass magazine selected Tubelite Inc. as #1 among the glass and metal industry’s “Best Companies to Word For” in the category of 101-1,000 employees. According to the magazine, “Through extensive benefit plans, continual training and corporate cultures that promote their employees’ wellbeing, these companies work hard everyday to make it a joy for employees to come to work.”

This annual industry report ranks companies using a weighted point system that assigns value to each of the various benefits offered by these companies. The point system is based on an independent survey of glass and metal industry company employees who explain which benefits are most important to them. The magazine further organizes the ranking by number of employees at each company. Tubelite includes more than 200 employees at four locations.

Tubelite’s controller, Shari Ludy, said, “We’re growing by leaps and bounds and the company shares that with the employees. The people are phenomenal.” In addition to the “company’s generous benefits package,” she noted that the company works to celebrate its success and growth on a quarterly basis through such events as group family activities, internal promotions, tuition reimbursement and certification rewards that all work to make employees feel supported.

Shelley Van Dyke, Tubelite’s human resources manager, added that the way the company treats its employees is reflected in the pride they demonstrate through commitment to a job well done. “We have a great team that takes pride in providing quality products and services to our customers on time and complete.”

Congratulations to all!

Bragging

Event: CSI CONSTRUCT, Sept. 25-27, Nashville

Tubelite returns to the Construction Specifications Institutue’s (CSI’s) CONSTRUCT show, where it will be exhibiting in booth #343. This year’s show is being held at the at the Music City Center in Nashville, Tenn., which relies on Tubelite’s products.

Exhibit hours:
Wed., Sept. 25 | 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Thurs., Sept. 26, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Fri., Sept. 27, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
 
CONSTRUCT is the only national trade show and educational conference for the commercial building teams that spec and source building products. This event is dedicated to institutional, industrial and commercial building industries. Join thousands of industry leaders that design, build, specify, engineer, renovate or operate in the build environment to procure real-world, practical knowledge for building success.

Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) is a national association dedicated to improving the documentation, management and communication of building information as used by the construction community. CSI accomplishes its mission through the development of construction standards and formats, such as MasterFormat and UniFormat; the promulgation of those formats through master guide specifications and building information management (BIM) software; training and certification programs, including the Construction Documents Technology (CDT) and Certified Construction Contract Administrator (CCCA) exams; publication of Construction Specifier magazine; and an ever-expanding membership of decision-makers who identify and specify building product solutions. CSI members include a cross-section of specifiers, architects, contractors, suppliers and other construction project professionals who are touched by construction documentation.

Shared Learnings: It’s That Time of Year

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

Summer sets as the autumn tradeshow season dawns. GlassBuild America, Sept. 10-12 in Atlanta, and CSI Construct, Sept. 25-27 in Nashville, bring that bittersweet reminder that we have entered the third quarter. This year’s expos are expected to showcase new fenestration products to meet commercial buildings’ increasingly stringent performance and code requirements.

Last October, Hurricane Sandy proved to be the second-costliest hurricane in U.S. history with damages estimated at $68 billion. The 2013 hurricane season already has produced four named storms. Entering into the peak of the season, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued an update in August predicting a 70% chance of seeing above-average activity in the Atlantic with potentially 13-19 named storms, six to nine hurricanes, and three to five of those hurricanes becoming major events.

Hurricane impact-resistant fenestration products help address commercial building owners’ concerns for mitigating damage to their property and protecting occupants from shattered glass and wind-borne debris. A breadth of storefront and entrance systems are available to comply with High-Velocity Hurricane Zone (HVHZ) wind zones, as well as Miami-Dade and Florida Building Codes.

As Model Energy Codes become a reality, more building owners will seek fenestration systems offering high thermal DOE_EnergyCodes_map_imgperformance. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Energy Codes Program maps current and projected commercial building energy code adoption activity. For example, in Georgia where GlassBuild is held, ASHRAE 90.1-2010/2012 IECC or equivalent is projected for adoption by the end of 2015. In California, this already has been adopted.

Energy efficiency, recycled content and daylighting remain key criteria in LEED® v.4, recently approved by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). In Tennessee where Construct is held, the USGBC reports that four “municipal governments have made policy commitments that advance better building practices by rewarding leadership with LEED… Tennessee state ranks 22nd in the nation with 529 commercial buildings that are LEED registered and certified, totaling more than 63 million square feet.”

This November, Pennsylvania will host USGBC members and allied professionals in Philadelphia for the annual Greenbuild International Conference and Expo. The state ranks fifth in the nation with 1,816 commercial buildings that are LEED registered and certified. Detailed market reports are available for download online at USGBC.org under the Resources page.

USGBC enjoys membership crossover with the American Institute of Architects (AIA). While AIA champions green building goals, it no longer requires its members to specifically earn continuing education credits for sustainable design. Although there are differences by state, AIA members now are required to complete 12 hours of health, safety and welfare (HSW) education, where eight hours previously were needed.

Thousands of AIA members earn these credits at their local chapters’ annual conferences and conventions, many of which are held during the autumn. A list of AIA’s 300 component organizations, contacts and events can be found at AIA.org under the AIA Chapters page. For example, AIA Illinois annual conference is scheduled for Nov 7-9.

Also is hosted in Illinois, Glass Expo Midwest takes place Oct. 31-Nov. 1 at the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel. Now in its 18th year, the event is conveniently co-located to welcome Fenestration Day attendees.

Whichever tradeshows and conferences you attend this autumn, remember to do more than just attend – participate! If you’re in a seminar, ask the speaker a question. If you’re in the expo hall, make time to see the newest products. If you’re at lunch, strike up a conversation with a colleague. These events are among the few industry forums for face-to-face interaction. Be sure to take advantage of them.

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Tubelite_TomMinnonTom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Event: AIA North Dakota, Sept. 16-18, Fargo

Tubelite will be exhibiting at the 2013 American Institute of Architects (AIA) North Dakota Design Conference and Trade Show
Sept. 16-18, at the Fargo Radisson Hotel and Fargo Civic Center.

The AIA is the largest and most influential professional association for architects, interns, and those directly involved with the practice of Architecture in the world. Based in Washington, DC. the AIA has almost 300 state and local chapters representing almost 80,000 members, including a majority of licensed architects in the United States. AIA North Dakota, a state chapter of AIA, is based in Bismarck, North Dakota and represents almost 200 members.

Events: GlassBuild America, Sept. 10-12, Atlanta

Tubelite returns to GlassBuild America, where it will be exhibiting in booth #1607.

GlassBuild America is organized by the National Glass Association, in partnership with the Glass Association of North America, the American Architectural Manufacturers Association, the Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance and the Bath Enclosure Manufacturers Association.
GlassBuild America 2013 will be held Sept. 10-12 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta.

John Priebe joins Tubelite as an architectural representative for the South Central states

TL_JohnPriebeTubelite Inc. has added John Priebe as an architectural representative serving clients in South Central states with storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems, including Tubelite’s ForceFront™ Storm and Blast products.

A fourth generation glazier, Priebe has worked in the industry his whole life and most recently served as general manager for glazing contractor Harmon, Inc.’s Cleveland office.

From an early age, he was cutting glass at his family’s glazing business in Buffalo, N.Y. He earned his construction technologies certification and joined the Glazier Union Local #660 where he served his apprenticeship. With three decades of professional experience in the shop and in the field, Priebe remained active with the Union as trustee of the Glaziers Trust Funds.

Moving from New York, Priebe sought out a position with Harmon and was hired at the company’s Orlando location as a small contracts project manager. Less than five years later, he was overseeing small contracts and glass services in both Orlando and Tampa. He continued to excel and eventually became director of service and special projects for Harmon’s clients in Florida and throughout the U.S. He remained with Harmon for 13 years.

Priebe is pleased to be a part of Tubelite’s team. He will share his industry knowledge and leadership with architectural clients in South Central states.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Shared Learnings: The NFRC Non-Residential Program

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

For the past 20 years, the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) has provided a fair, accurate, and credible rating and labeling system for windows, doors, and skylights used in residential construction. Anyone who has shopped for a residential window has seen a label similar to the one below:

ES_NFRC_LabelRatings on the NFRC label have been achieved through standardized test methods at independently operated laboratories. This standardized method allows you to fairly compare window performance of “Manufacturer A” to “Manufacturer B.”

The NFRC testing protocols involve testing of the full window — including glass, frame, spacers, and any other component that is a permanent part of the complete product. This strategy provides a more accurate reflection of how the product will perform in the home than testing of just glass, as the framing and other components influence ratings such as U-Factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) and Visible Transmittance (VT).

In commercial storefront and curtainwall glazing systems, glazing contractors combine various components that have not been tested as a complete product. For instance, storefront or curtainwall from one manufacturer; glass, coatings and infill from another; and the insulting glass spacer from yet another.

NFRC’s Component Modeling Approach (CMA) Product Certification Program enables whole product energy performance ratings for non-residential projects. CMA uses a simulation tool called CMA Software Tool (CMAST), which includes a database of online performance data for the three primary components of a fenestration product — glazing, frame, and glass spacer — to generate overall product performance ratings for U-Factor, SHGC and VT. The database is essentially a library that houses data on a wide variety of fenestration components. Microsoft PowerPoint - EduCode Presentation R2 [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

While the CMA program has been around for a number of years, it is just now beginning to be widely used and accepted. CMA’s non-residential energy performance data is used in determining code compliance and for meaningful whole building energy analysis. The certification and rating program is credible, simple, cost effective, fair, uniform and useful.

Though the current non-residential program offered by the NFRC Site-Built program provides consistent and reliable energy performance ratings, the CMA program allows for different segments of the fenestration industry to obtain standardized energy performance ratings for fenestration components and component systems including glass, spacers, and frames.

Once tested by an accredited lab, modeled by an Approved Calculation Entity, validated by an approved Inspection Agency, and entered into the CMAST database, these systems reside in electronic libraries that can be easily accessed by those who wish to determine and/or obtain NFRC energy performance ratings (U-Factor, SHGC, VT) for entire window, entrance, storefront, and curtainwall systems.

The libraries are especially useful to architects and builders for:

  • Designing envelope/fenestration systems for maximum energy efficiency — whether solar control, energy efficiency, daylighting, or passive solar design
  • Comparing the energy performance of different fenestration components and products, and making more informed choices
  • Enforcing – related specified performance to installed performance

In the example below, the total performance characteristics of the total system are as follows —

  • U-Factor: 0.34
  • SHGC: 0.20
  • VT: 0.43
  • LSG: 0.43/0.20 = 2.15 (visible light to solar heat gain)

TL_300ES_NFRC-CMAST

These values are based on the following components:

  • Tubelite’s 400 Series curtainwall with 2.5 x 7.5-inch aluminum framing and fiberglass pressure plate
  • PPG’s Solarban® 70XL low-e glass with 90% argon fill
  • Technoform Glass Insulation’s warm edge spacer

CMA shows how changing one component affects overall energy efficiency and provides information on which components can be combined. Ultimately, the information obtained from CMA can be used to determine a whole product energy performance rating for a fenestration system.

Resources:
Efficient Windows Collaborative, http://www.commercialwindows.org/
ENERGY STAR, http://www.energystar.gov
National Fenestration Rating Council, http://www.nfrc.org/Tubelite_TomMinnon
Technoform Glass Insulation, http://www.glassinsulation.us/
Tubelite Inc., http://www.tubeliteinc.com

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Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Tubelite’s new Dallas/Fort Worth facility is now operational

Tubelite_Texas_FrontTubelite Inc., a leading manufacturer and supplier of architectural aluminum storefront, entrance and curtainwall systems in the United States, is pleased to announce that is has completed the initial set-up of its new Texas facility at 4900 Langdon Rd., Suite 500 Dallas, Texas 75241. The new facility is now staffed and operationally ready to service the company’s clients within the Texas and South Central region.

“We are very pleased with how well everything went on the project,” says Ken Werbowy, president of Tubelite. In addition to carrying stock Tubelite_Texas_Interiorproduct inventory and servicing clients with damage-free delivery service, the new 27,500-square-foot building area will provide on-site CNC machining for door and frame fabrication. Employees previously working out of the company’s Mesquite, Texas office in addition to several employees from the company’s Walker, Michigan plant have already transitioned to the new location.

Werbowy adds, “This facility is easily accessible to accommodate shipping needs and is centralized within the region to provide even faster lead-times and damage-free shipments to our customers in the region.”

An upcoming open house is being planned for clients in the region.

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Events: AIA Expo, June 20-22, Denver

Tubelite Inc. will be at the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Expo 2013 in booth #3139. It is one of more than 700 exhibitors at the Colorado Convention Center, Denver.

AIA Expo 2013 Hours
Thurs., June 20, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
Fri., June 21, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.
Sat., June 22, 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

For more than 150 years, members of AIA have worked with each other and their communities to create more valuable, healthy, secure and sustainable buildings and cityscapes. Members adhere to a code of ethics and professional conduct to ensure the highest standards in professional practice. Embracing their responsibility to serve society, AIA members engage civic and government leaders and the public in helping find needed solutions to pressing issues facing our communities, institutions, nation and world.

Tubelite introduces high-performance TU24000 storefront

Tubelite_TU24000storefront_cutawayHelping commercial buildings meet energy conservation needs, Tubelite introduces its newest storefront system – TU24000 Series. This high-performance storefront system is part of Tubelite’s Therml=Block™ product offering and features an additional pour and debridged thermal break pocket to withstand the most demanding climates and conditions. Optimizing thermal performance contributes to energy efficiency and helps reduce associated heating and cooling costs.

“The TU24000 Series’ dual pocket improves thermal performance by dramatically decreasing U-Factors and increasing Condensation Resistance Factors when compared with a single pour and debridged thermal break pocket used with the same size and type of insulated glass,” says Tubelite’s marketing manager Mary Olivier.

Tubelite_TU24000storefrontTubelite’s TU24000 Series storefront achieved exceptional performance test results in accordance with AAMA 501.1 and 1503, ASTM E283, E331, E330 and E90, as well as NFRC rating systems. Azon’s Lancer® mechanical lock provides long-term resistance to shrinkage of the polyurethane barrier.

TU24000 is recommended for low-rise buildings and the lower floors of high-rises. The glass is centered in the 4.5-inch-deep system for a pleasing reveal on the exterior and interior sides of the frame. This new storefront system matches the 2-by-4.5-inch profile on its popular T14000 Series system.

Assembled using screw spline or clip joinery, TU24000 Series’ framing is compatible with Tubelite’s Medium and Wide Stile Therml=Block Doors. The storefront’s framing also has 0.5-inch bite for use with glass or panels up to 1-inch thick. Verticals can be steel reinforced for high-performance against strong windloads. Tubelite’s 3700 Series operable windows can be glazed into the storefront framing pocket for natural ventilation.

Beyond the environmental benefits of high thermal performance and natural ventilation, the aluminum used to produce Tubelite’s systems can be extruded using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes. Seven anodized finishes and 20 standard paint color are available on TU24000 Series storefront framing system.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Shared Learnings: Aluminum Finishing – PVDF Coatings (part 2 of 2)

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

Know the Code

When specifying a paint code for your project, always double check for accuracy. The specific code is what drives the ordering process and the achieved color. The color name is only a guideline; many times manufacturers and applicators will have the same paint name for different paint types and colors. Relying on a color name alone can be a risk. As an example, one manufacturer can have 50 paint codes all named “Hartford Green.”

Coated aluminum panels have been tested for performance in the high-salt, high-humidity, and high-UV exposure environment of South Florida. Image courtesy of Linetec.

Coated aluminum panels have been tested for performance in the high-salt, high-humidity, and high-UV exposure environment of South Florida. Image courtesy of Linetec.

Accuracy of the paint code is vital. Paint manufacturer and many applicators have their own coding system for assigning paint codes to colors. Each letter and number within the product formula has a specific meaning related to the color and tint, gloss, primer, topcoat, or the use of mica and metallics. Due to the immeasurable number of different paint codes, one incorrect number or letter within a code can completely change the paint formulation.

Architects’ specifications for fluoropolymer finishes often read as: “PVDF-Based Coating: AAMA 2605, fluoropolymer finish containing minimum 70 percent PVDF resins, color to be selected from manufacturer’s full color range.”

This generic specification makes it very difficult for the aluminum manufacturer and glazing contractor to determine what price level they should include in their quote. Most aluminum manufacturers have a list of stock paint colors that have a lower price point than other colors. Does “manufacturer’s full color range” include all possible colors available from the paint manufacturer? Will it be a two-coat or XL three-coat finish? Whenever possible, the architect should clearly state what color will be required on the project.

AAMA Specifications

AAMA 2603 is typically an interior specification. Baked enamel (acrylic/polyester) paints should meet AAMA 2603. The baked enamel coatings are harder than the fluoropolymer PVDF coatings and often are used for interior application where color retention is not required. These paints are less expensive, but have poor resistance to color fading and chalking.

AAMA 2604 is an “intermediate” specification. A paint meeting this specification would be a 50% fluoropolymer. An application for this paint would be storefront, doors or other high-traffic areas. This finish will provide good color and gloss retention. It also will provide good hardness and abrasion resistance.

AAMA 2605 is the high-performance exterior specification. A paint meeting this specification would be a 70% fluoropolymer. These finishes exhibit outstanding resistance to humidity, color change, chalk, gloss loss and chemicals. An application for this finish would include monumental architectural projects.

TomM_AnodizeTable
Field Repair

Whether your building’s finish has faded and discolored, or your new building has been damaged during construction, it can be corrected on-site with a knowledgeable team and the proper product.

Storefronts and other high-traffic areas may need to be repainted periodically. As good as it is, painted aluminum is not completely maintenance-free, nor does it last forever. Painted aluminum can chip and scratch on high-wear areas such as sliding doors and entrance ways.

For more than 40 years, PVDF-based finishes have held the position as the world’s premiere exterior metal finish. PVDF-based Air Dry System (ADS) offers the same superior weathering properties as factory-appliced PVDF, and can be field-applied on almost any building material, restoring surfaces to last and look like new.

PVDF-based ADS coatings are designed for repairing, restoring and/or repainting the metal on buildings that have a factory-applied PVDF-based coating. These coatings only can be applied by licensed fluoropolymer applicators. PVDF-based ADS coatings are intended for use as a two-coat system. PVDF-based ADS provides very high resistance to fading, chalking, UV degradation and chemical corrosion. PVDF-based ADS restores structures to their original luster, while meeting weathering requirements of AAMA 2605, the most stringent specification for architectural coatings.

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Resources:

* Arkema Kynar
* Linetec
* Tubelite Inc.
* Solvay Hylar

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Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Tubelite adds Greg Hall to engineering team in Texas

Greg Hall has been hired as a product development engineer working at Tubelite’s facility in Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas.Tubelite_GregHall_crop

Hall brings nearly 30 years of experience with storefront, curtainwall, windows, and hurricane impact systems. He says, “After learning about the company’s vision, growth and goals for the future, I decided I wanted to be a part of the team. The thing that impressed me the most about Tubelite was its reputation for customer service.”

Prior to joining Tubelite, Hall worked for 10 years with Oldcastle Building Envelope (formerly Vistawall) as a senior product development designer. Previous to that, he was a design engineer at International Aluminum and at U.S. Aluminum.

Before moving south, he attended the University of Northern Iowa where he earned a Bachelor of Technology in industrial technology. Today, he lives in Forney, Texas, and shares his industry knowledge as an active member of the Glass Association of North America (GANA). Most recently, he has been involved in writing GANA’s new Commercial Fenestration Systems Manual (CFSM) manual.

In addition to Tubelite’s GANA membership, it is a member of the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA), the Construction Specification Institute (CSI), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and an approved continuing education provider through the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Shared Learnings: Aluminum Finishing – PVDF Coatings (part 1 of 2)

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

Fluoropolymer coatings are two-coat systems formulated to provide excellent performance against weathering in normal environments. Suited for architectural product applications — such as storefronts, curtainwalls, windows and louvers — these coatings are highly resistant to chalking, chipping, peeling and fading. They also protect against chemical staining and environmental stresses such as dirt, ultraviolet (UV) radiation and acid rain. The coatings are available in a wide range of earth tone colors and offer excellent color consistency.

“XL” coatings are three- and four-coat systems consisting of a primer, a fluoropolymer color coat, a clear topcoat and sometimes a barrier coat to seal and protect the entire system. A clear top coat is required for one of two reasons, to protect and encapsulate the metallic flake in the topcoat, or to give added UV protection to bright and exotic colors.

These coatings offer the perfect solution for projects such as chlorine rooms, sewage treatment facilities, power plants, paper mills and highly aggressive environments including industrial and seacoast areas where maximum protection against chemical and salt spray corrosion is required.

Please note that paint manufacturers do not recommended using a clear topcoat over a white color paint. The clear topcoat is not required and will not extend warranty periods. The application of a clear coat can affect the tone of the underlying color. The color coat typically shifts toward yellow when a clear is applied. This is due to the fact that clear coats are not “water white” or colorless, but are actually a slightly yellow color. The degree of color change seen with a clear coat over a white is usually deemed unacceptable.

Coated aluminum panels have been tested for performance in the high-salt, high-humidity, and high-ultraviolet (UV) exposure environment of South Florida. Image courtesy of Linetec

Coated aluminum panels have been tested for performance in the high-salt, high-humidity, and high-UV exposure environment of South Florida. Image courtesy of Linetec.

Name Your Brand

Kynar or Kynar 500® is not a finished paint. It is a registered trademark brand name for PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) resin, as is Hylar 5000®. Arkema is the manufacturer of Kynar and Kynar 500 resin. Solvay is the manufacturer of Hylar 5000 resin.

PVDF resin is the raw material used by licensed formulators to manufacture PVDF-based coatings. When formulated into a coating composition, the paint contains a minimum of 70% by weight of Kynar 500 or Hylar 5000 resin to manufacture a 70% PVDF resin-based coating that meets the highest performance criteria of AAMA 2605.

PPG manufactures Duranar®, Valspar manufactures Fluropon® and AkzoNobel manufactures Trinar® – all are examples of 70%  PVDF coatings that utilize the Kynar 500 and/or Hylar 5000 resin.

The key to a product’s performance is the resin chemistry. For the ultimate in long-term durability, time has shown that PVDF resin is the one to choose. Other coating resins include acrylic, polyester, silicone polyester and urethane.

Why Specify?

To be both functional and decorative, metal must be coated with a finish that beautifies with color and doesn’t chalk; a finish that won’t lose its color and sheen; a finish that won’t pit, chip or age before it’s time. No other coating system withstands the rigors of nature and time like those based on PVDF resins. This high-performance fluoropolymer resin, with its extraordinary capability to retain color and gloss, keeps painted metal looking vibrant and appealing.

While applicators and paint suppliers warrant 70% PVDF finishes for up to 20 years, many more years of service life should be expected.

Get the Lead Out

In the architectural coatings industry, it takes certain pigments to get bright and exotic colors such as reds, oranges and yellows. The most commonly known pigments to achieve these colors are the minerals lead and cadmium. Throughout the years, environmental and health concerns have spurred increasingly stringent regulatory requirements for the use and disposal of both lead and cadmium pigments. As a result, environmentally conscious manufacturers and applicators have refrained from using these pigments in their coating systems.

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Resources:Tubelite_TomMinnon

* Arkema Kynar
* Linetec
* Tubelite Inc.
* Solvay Hylar

Watch for part 2 on PVDF Coatings in May and in “Architect’s Guide to Glass and Metal.”

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Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Events: NGA Mid-Atlantic Chapter’s Annual Glass Expo, April 17, Greenbelt, MD

Tubelite exhibited at the National Glass Association’s (NGA’s) Mid-Atlantic Chapter‘s 26th Annual Glass Expo on Wed., April 17, 3-9 p.m. at Martin’s Crosswinds, Greenbelt, Maryland.

This is the mid-Atlantic region’s premier glass industry show and the only glass exposition in the Washington, D.C. area.

Mike Kwasny serves Utah and southern Colorado as Tubelite’s client development manager

Tubelite_MikeKwasnyTubelite, Inc. named Mike Kwasny, CDT, as a client development manager serving Utah and southern Colorado. Kwasny provides glazing contractors with storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems.

“With Tubelite’s breadth of product and reputation for dependability, I see strong potential for assisting the glazing contractors and architects in my territory who are concentrating on low-rise commercial buildings, such as schools, churches, medical offices and mixed-use retail/office spaces. In addition to working directly with glaziers, I enjoy assisting architectural firms with the design and specification details needed to bring these projects to life,” says Kwasny.

He continues, “With stricter energy codes, we have a great opportunity with our 300ES curtainwall, Max/Block sun shades, aLuminate light shelves and our other products contributing to thermal performance.” Kwasny adds that he is excited about Tubelite’s continued growth and its expansion of operations with a Dallas/ Fort Worth facility.

Most recently, Kwasny worked as a sales representative for Manko Windows Systems in Colorado. Prior to that, he dedicated 28 years to Oldcasstle (Vistawall) as a sales representative in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming. Before moving to Colorado, Kwasny lived in the Midwest and earned a B.S. at the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse.

As a member of the Construction Specification Institute (CSI), Kwasny successfully completed the certification exam to become a Construction Documents Technologist (CDT). He enjoys sharing his industry insight and looks forward to presenting Tubelite’s educational and technical resources through involvement in associations and events.

In addition to Tubelite’s CSI membership, it is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA), the Glass Association of North America (GANA), and an approved continuing education provider through the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Tubelite announces expansion in Dallas/Fort Worth

Tubelite Inc., a leading manufacturer and supplier of architectural aluminum storefront, entrance and curtainwall systems in the United States, has finalized the location of their Texas facility. The selected site at 4900 Langdon Road is on the southeast side of Dallas and near the I-20 / I-45 interchange.

“The expansion project is progressing nicely,” says Ken Werbowy, president of Tubelite.

The building plans have been drafted for the greater than 27,000 square foot area that will provide on-site CNC machining for door and frame fabrication, as well as warehousing stock products. The plan layout also includes an office area to accommodate the transition of existing client services personnel, who currently are working out of the company’s Mesquite, Texas office.

Werbowy adds, “This facility is easily accessible to accommodate shipping needs and is centralized within the region to provide even faster lead-times and damage-free shipments to our customers in the region.”

“This is a top priority for us and the team is committed to keep this project moving quickly,” adds Chuck Pope, director of operations.

An open house is planned for the location once it is fully operational.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Shared Learnings: What is Anodizing? (part 2 of 2)

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

Specifying Anodized Finishes

The Aluminum Association has developed a system of designation for anodized finishes on aluminum. Specific finishes of the various types are designated by a letter followed by a two-digit numeral. Each designation may be combined into a single composite designation to identify a sequence of operations covering all of the important steps leading to a final complex finish.

Linetec_Anodize1

Almost all finishes used on aluminum may be subdivided into three major categories: mechanical finishes, chemical finishes and coatings.

Descriptions of the most commonly utilized finishes are as follows:

* Mechanical: (M)
M10 – Unspecified as fabricated

* Chemical (C)
C21- Fine matte (eco-friendly etch process)
C22 – Medium matte etch (caustic etch process)

* Anodic Coatings (A)
Architectural Class II (0.4-0.7 mils thick)
A31 – Clear
A32 – Integral Color
A34 – Electrolytically deposited color (two-step)

Architectural Class I (0.7 mil and thicker anodic coating)
A41 – Clear
A44 – Electrolytically deposited color (two-step)

All composite designations are preceded by the letters “AA” to identify them as an Aluminum Association designation.

* Example 1: Aluminum Association (plus) Mechanical Finish (plus) Chemical Etching (plus) Anodic Coating translates to:
Class II Clear Anodized Finish AA‑M10‑C21‑A31 complying with AAMA 611

* Example 2: An Architectural Class I medium bronze electrolytic deposition (two-step) would be designated:
Class I Color Anodized Finish: AA‑M10‑C21‑A44 complying with AAMA 611. Provide color as indicated.

Linetec_Anodize2

Maintenance and Cleaning

As with any finished building material, anodized aluminum requires reasonable care prior to and during installation, and periodic cleaning and maintenance after installation. Although anodized aluminum possesses exceptional resistance to corrosion, discoloration and wear, its natural beauty can be marred by harsh chemicals, rough conditions or neglect. The marks resulting from such mistreatment may be permanent. For example, mortar, cement and other alkaline materials will quickly corrode anodic coatings if allowed to dry on the metal surface.

Surfaces exposed to the atmosphere will collect soil and dirt, the amount of which varies depending on geographic area, environmental conditions, finish and location of the building. More frequent cleaning may be required in heavily industrialized areas compared to rural areas. Seasonal rainfall can reduce washing frequency by removing water-soluble deposits and less adherent soil. In climates where rainfall is low, atmospheric washing of the surface is minimal. These areas may require more frequent cleaning than in areas where rainfall is more prevalent.

Never use aggressive alkaline or acid cleaners on aluminum finishes. Do not use cleaners containing trisodium phosphate, phosphoric acid, hydrochloric acid or similar compounds. It is preferable to clean the metal when shaded. Do not attempt to clean hot, sun-heated surfaces since chemical reactions on hot metal surfaces will be accelerated and non-uniform.

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Resources:

* Aluminum Anodizers Council
* The Aluminum Association
* American Architectural Manufacturers Association
* Linetec
* Tubelite Inc.

**Tubelite_TomMinnon

Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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John Wiemer serves Arkansas and Oklahoma as Tubelite’s client development manager

John Wiemer has been named as Tubelite’s client development manager serving glazing contractors, specification writers and architectural clients in Arkansas and Oklahoma. He will offer support with clients’ storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting system needs, including Tubelite’s ForceFront™ Storm and Blast products.JohnWiemer

Located in Hot Springs Village, Ark., Wiemer brings more than 30 years of industry experience to his new role at Tubelite. “The glass and glazing industry is like a big family to me,” says Wiemer. “It is a pleasure to join Tubelite. The company is adding people and equipment, and adding a regional facility in Dallas. Their growth during this tough time speaks to their excellent teamwork and strategies.”

Wiemer previously dedicated three decades of his career as an architectural sales representative with Kawneer. Most recently, he worked for Valley Building Specialties where he supervised the estimating and project management department.

In addition to his hands-on knowledge, Wiemer earned a degree in building construction technology from Arkansas’ John Brown University. He also is a certified Construction Document Technologist (CDT) through the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI).

Both Wiemer and Tubelite are members of CSI. Further supporting its clients, Tubelite is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA), the Glass Association of North America (GANA), and an approved continuing education provider through the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Shared Learnings: What is Anodizing? (part 1 of 2)

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

What is Anodizing?

Anodizing is an electrochemical process that converts aluminum’s metal surface into a decorative, durable, corrosion-resistant, anodic oxide finish. It is readily available for storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

Exposed to the earth’s atmosphere, aluminum combines with oxygen to form a protective surface film, which inhibits further oxidation of the aluminum. This natural oxide is extremely thin, loosely adhered to the aluminum surface and easily removed by handling. Anodizing is a process, which thickens the natural oxide film resulting in a heavy aluminum oxide film of controlled thickness having the hardness similar to that of a ruby or sapphire. Anodizing is, therefore, a matter of highly controlled oxidation—the enhancement of a naturally occurring phenomenon.

Anodizing uses the base metal – the aluminum alloy – to create a thin, extremely strong and corrosion-resistant finish. The anodized surface is very hard and thus preserves and extends the life of the aluminum product. Architectural aluminum anodic coatings provide good stability to ultraviolet (UV) rays and does not chip or peel.

The anodic oxide structure originates from the aluminum substrate and is composed entirely of aluminum oxide. This aluminum oxide is not applied to the surface like paint or plating, but is fully integrated with the underlying aluminum substrate, so it cannot chip or peel. It has a highly ordered, porous structure that allows for secondary processes such as coloring and sealing.

Anodize_Magnification

Anodizing offers a range of colors in earth tones, such as champagne, bronze-tones and black. Unlike other finishes, anodizing allows the aluminum to maintain its metallic appearance. Clear anodizing does not incorporate any pigments.

When aluminum is anodized, an electrical current is passed through a bath of sulfuric acid (the electrolyte), while the aluminum being treated serves as the anode. This produces a clear film of aluminum oxide on the aluminum’s surface. This layer is mostly porous with a very thin barrier layer at the base. This structure lends itself very well to electrolytic coloring.

Anodizing is a water-based process and uses no volatile organic compounds (VOCs). There are no vehicle solvents, no carrier resins, and any pigmentation used in anodizing is created by extremely small amounts of metals or dye securely locked within the hard surface. No toxic organics are used in anodizing. Recyclability of aluminum is unaltered by anodizing and no intermediate processing is needed for anodized metal to re-enter the recycle chain.

Anodizing is a safe process that is not harmful to human health. An anodized finish is chemically stable, will not decompose and is non-toxic. The anodizing process is non-hazardous and produces no harmful or dangerous by-products. Under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, conventional anodizing generates no hazardous waste; it does not use VOCs or EPA-listed toxic organics.

Anodized products have an extremely long life span and offer significant economic advantages through maintenance and operating savings. Anodizing is a reacted finish that is integrated with the underlying aluminum for total bonding and unmatched adhesion.

The Anodizing Process

* Clean – The anodize process begins with the material being cleaned in a non-etching alkaline chemical cleaner to remove all shop dirt, water, soluble oils and other unwanted surface contaminates. which may have accumulated on the material during handling and/or manufacturing.

* Rinse – After cleaning, the material is rinsed and is then ready for etching.

* Etch – Etching is an important step during the anodize process. It is designed to dissolve a thin layer on the surface of the aluminum to develop a smooth uniform finish. Most anodizers have changed their etch chemistry from conventional caustic etch to a more eco-friendly acid etch technology.

The eco-friendly acid etch creates an aesthetically appealing, “frostier” appearance that helps hide small defects, such as die lines, flow lines, minor corrosion and scratches, that may occur on the aluminum surface. Although neither conventional or acid etch removes irregularities in the aluminum, acid etch does a better job of concealing them. This gives the material a better aesthetic finish on both primary and recycled aluminum extrusions.

* Desmut – Material is then moved to deoxidzing and desmutting process, which further prepares the aluminum surface for subsequent finishing. This step removes surface oxides. It also removes smut, which is a combination of intermetallics, metal and metal oxides remaining on the surface after cleaning and etching. And, it actives the surface for the electrochemical anodizing.

* Anodize – In the anodizing tank, the electrochemical oxidation of an aluminum surface takes place to produce a stable film of oxide. In this process, a porous, insulative layer composed of aluminum and oxygen is produced by passing electricity through the aluminum in a conductive medium. The basic structure of an anodic coating is based on a series of hexagonal columns of oxide, each with a central pore and a thin barrier layer separating the electrolyte in the base of the pores from the underlying metal.

* Electrolytic Color – The coloring of an anodic film is designed to enhance the appearance of the material and broaden the opportunity for anodized aluminum applications. In electrolytic coloring, or “two-step” coloring, anodizing is followed by the electro-deposition of a metal. AC power is used to deposit tin metal. Deposition takes place at the bottom of the pore. The intensity of the color is dependent on the amount of tin deposited and the packing density.

* Seal – After anodizing and coloring, the material is sealed in a mid-temperature hydrothermal seal and then given a final hot water rinse. This last, important step ensures that the high-quality anodized finishes will maintain their beauty and durability for many years.

Linetec_Anodize3

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Resources:

* Aluminum Anodizers Council
* The Aluminum Association
* American Architectural Manufacturers Association
* Linetec
* Tubelite Inc.

Watch for part 2 on anodizing in March and in “Architect’s Guide to Glass and Metal.”

**Tubelite_TomMinnon

Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Tubelite announces expansion in Dallas/Fort Worth (Feb. 12, 2013)

Tubelite Inc., a leading manufacturer and supplier of architectural aluminum storefront, entrance and curtainwall systems in the United States, has announced it will be expanding its operational footprint during the second quarter of this year with the establishment of a new regional facility in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. The site selection is in process and will be greater than 25,000 square feet.

“We are extremely proud and excited to be expanding upon our already-established presence within the Texas and South Central market with this new facility,” says Ken Werbowy, president of Tubelite. “This new facility will allow us to provide even faster lead-times and damage-free shipments to our existing customers in the region through the use of on-site CNC machining for door and frame fabrication, as well as warehousing stock products.”

Existing client services personnel, who currently are working out of the company’s Mesquite, Texas offices, will relocate to the new facility where they will join new hires for the operation. To complement the investment and commitment to the region, the company has begun recruiting for additional sales and architectural specification positions to further assist their customers in the area.

Werbowy adds, “This expansion strengthens our current strategy and commitment to both our glazing contractor clients, as well as distributors in the region.”

About Tubelite Inc.
Tubelite was established in 1945. The company’s headquarters, and primary distribution, warehousing and assembly operations are located in Walker, Mich. Its facility in Reed City, Mich., houses the company’s aluminum extrusion operation. The company is a subsidiary of Apogee Enterprises, Inc. (NASDAQ: APOG). Apogee, headquartered in Minneapolis, is a leader in technologies involving the design and development of value-added glass products and services.

Forward-Looking Statements
The discussion above contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements reflect Apogee management’s expectations or beliefs as of the date of this release. Apogee undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. All forward-looking statements are qualified by factors that may affect the operating results of Apogee, including the following: operational risks within (A) the architectural segment: i) competitive, price-sensitive and changing market conditions, including unforeseen project delays and cancellations; ii) economic conditions, material cost increases and the cyclical nature of the North American and Latin American commercial construction industries; iii) product performance, reliability, execution or quality problems that could delay payments, increase costs, impact orders or lead to litigation; and iv) the segment’s ability to fully and efficiently utilize production capacity; and (B) the large-scale optical segment: i) markets that are impacted by consumer confidence and trends; ii) dependence on a relatively small number of customers; iii) changing market conditions, including unfavorable shift in product mix and new competition; and iv) ability to fully and efficiently utilize production capacity. Additional factors include: i) revenue and operating results that are volatile; ii) financial market disruption which could impact company, customer and supplier credit availability; iii) self-insurance risk related to a material product liability event and to health insurance programs; iv) cost of compliance with governmental regulations relating to hazardous substances; and v) foreign currency risk related to certain continuing operations. Apogee cautions investors that actual future results could differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements, and that other factors may in the future prove to be important in affecting Apogee’s results of operations. New factors emerge from time to time and it is not possible for management to predict all such factors, nor can it assess the impact of each such factor on the business or the extent to which any factor, or a combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements. For a more detailed explanation of the foregoing and other risks and uncertainties, see Item 1A of Apogee’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 3, 2012.

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Shared Learnings: The Benefits of Natural Daylighting, part 3 of 3

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

Daylighting and Retail

Recent studies report that daylighting can offer retail establishments a strong competitive advantage. This is supported by a study commissioned by PG&E that compares the retail sales performance of 108 stores operated by a large (unidentified) chain retailer. Two-thirds of the stores had skylighting, and the remaining one-third did not. Otherwise, the stores were very similar, with the same basic interior design, the same merchandise and all management and advertising handled by headquarters. Considering several factors, skylighting was found to have the largest impact, boosting a store’s sales index by an average of 40%.

The appearance of daylighting very often contributed to achieving a fresh appearance: clean, crisp, clear and bright. One effective application of daylight is incorporating skylights in the changing room to provide an opportunity for consumers to see natural skin tones, and fabric colors as they will be experienced outside of the store.

Walmart in Aurora, Colo., uses vertical clerestories to effective daylight the store. Photos courtesy of DOE/NREL, Credit – Pat Corkery.

Walmart in Aurora, Colo., uses vertical clerestories to effective daylight the store. Photos courtesy of DOE/NREL, Credit – Pat Corkery.

Wal-Mart Success Story

Many Wal-Mart stores and distribution centers around the world include a daylight harvesting system, which integrates skylights that dim or turn off interior electric lighting in response to the amount of daylight available. By using dimmable T-8 fluorescent lamps, electronic continuous dimming ballasts and computer controlled daylight sensors with approximately one skylight per every 1,000 square feet, they take full advantage of natural light when available.

Daylight harvesting is estimated to save up to 75% of the electric lighting energy used in the sales area of a supercenter during daylight hours. Each daylight harvesting system is estimated to save an average of 800,000 kWh per year, which is enough energy to power 73 single-family homes (11,020 kWh average annual usage) for an entire year.

Every facility Wal-Mart builds today from the ground up includes a skylight/dimming system. Nationwide, Wal-Mart builds or converts 200-300 facilities each year. All new stores will include the daylighting system.

NREL has been monitoring and evaluating more than 50 different technologies that Wal-Mart installed in its experimental Supercenter store in Aurora, Colorado, including daylighting. Photos courtesy of DOE/NREL, Credit – Pat Corkery.

NREL has been monitoring and evaluating more than 50 different technologies that Wal-Mart installed in its experimental Supercenter store in Aurora, Colorado, including daylighting. Photos courtesy of DOE/NREL, Credit – Pat Corkery.

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Resources:

* Tubelite Inc.
* Retail Skylighting (PDF)
* Architects’ Perception of Daylighting in Commercial Building Design
* Daylighting Collaborative
* Energy Design Resources
* Concepts for Daylight Harvesting (PDF)

**Tubelite_TomMinnon

Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Shared Learnings: The Benefits of Natural Daylighting, part 2 of 3

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

An integrated design balances the cooling load of the window against required daylight illumination levels, thereby capturing both cooling and lighting energy savings without creating discomfort. A poor design imposes a substantial cooling load and creates glare. Achieving this balance requires careful and informed design and engineering.

Daylighting requires the participation and cooperation of multiple disciplines — architecture, lighting design and mechanical system design in conjunction with proper glass selection. Even when the proper components are selected, poor design and commissioning practices often lead to unreliable performance and uncomfortable work environments.

Control the Glare

Glare from natural sunlight can offset any positive attributes of daylighting. Glare will contribute to eyestrain and reduced productivity. Care must be taken in how daylight is allowed into the building without causing glare.

Some design elements may include:

* Exterior sunshades – Effective on south facing elevations only and may not have a positive effect during the winter months when the sun is low in the sky

Tubelite Inc. - Max/Block™ Sun Shade

Tubelite Inc. – Max/Block™ Sun Shade

* Translucent (as opposed to transparent) glazing – Very effective when used in skylighting applications

* Light redirecting systems – Light louvers or light shelves are effective at both controlling the glare as well as redirecting light toward the ceiling.

LightLouver LLC

LightLouver LLC

* Manually or automatically controlled blinds – Consider blinds between the glass to avoid damage and eliminate cleaning

Wausau Window and Wall Systems - projected window with integral blinds

Wausau Window and Wall Systems – projected window with integral blinds

* Electrochromic or thermochromic glazing – Tints the glass either electronically or by natural solar heat.

SAGE Electrochromics

SAGE Electrochromics

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Resources:

* Tubelite Inc.
* Light Louver LLC
* Wausau Window and Wall Systems
* SAGE Electrochromics
* Daylighting Collaborative

Watch for part three on daylighting in January and in “Architect’s Guide to Glass and Metal.”

**Tubelite_TomMinnon

Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Shared Learnings: The Benefits of Natural Daylighting, part 1 of 3

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

As winter approaches, and the amount of daylight decreases, it’s important to realize the positive effects of natural daylight. The lack of daylight has been documented to cause Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), maladjustment of our body clocks (circadian rhythms) and consistent periods of reduced productivity and enthmattophoto architectural photographyusiasm. One solution is providing a well-lit space, with as much natural light as possible. Daylighting provides superior quality, full-spectrum, flicker-free light that positively impacts behavior. In study after study, daylighting is correlated to dramatic improvements in human performance in retail, workplace, educational and health care facilities.

Daylight is a full spectrum source of visible light. That is, it imparts the same spectral distribution as sunlight. Unlike electric lights, which sometimes provide a limited spectral range that is concentrated in the blue/green or yellow/green range, daylight is best suited to human vision. Daylight can also provide various illumination levels through proper design. These inherent characteristics of daylight contribute to improved lighting quality by enhancing color discrimination and rendering. Working by daylight is believed to result in less stress and discomfort.

Turn Off the Lights

Daylighting saves dollars by using controls to automatically turn off the electric lights when interior daylight levels are sufficient for the task. This reduces both lighting and cooling costs, since reduced electric lighting cuts cooling loads. Daylight is inherently more efficient than electric light, contributing substantially less heat to a space for the same amount of light.

Electric lighting comprises 515,000,000 MWh or 20 percent of the nation’s electricity consumption. Of this total, approximately 10-15 percent is used to light a building’s perimeter zone where daylight is already present. For daytime-occupied commercial buildings, research projections show that total electricity and peak demand savings of 20-40 percent in lighting and its associated cooling energy can be achieved with the proper use of dimmable daylighting controls throughout the United States. Daylighting a building properly is like adding an alternative energy power plant that produces zero carbon emissions.

mattophoto architectural photography

Designing for Daylight

Daylighting strategies and architectural design strategies are inseparable. Daylight not only replaces artificial lighting, reducing lighting energy use, but also influences both heating and cooling loads. Planning for daylight therefore involves integrating the perspectives and requirements of various specialties and professionals. Daylighting design starts with the selection of a building site and continues as long as the building is occupied.

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Resources:

Architects’ Perception of Daylighting in Commercial Building Design

Daylighting Collaborative

Energy Design Resources

Concepts for daylight harvesting (PDF)

Watch for parts two and three on daylighting in December and January and in “Architect’s Guide to Glass and Metal.”

**

Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Tubelite adds Danny Lamartiniere as client development manager for Louisiana, Mississippi

Danny Lamartiniere joins Tubelite, Inc. as client development manager in Louisiana and Mississippi providing storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems to owners, architects and glazing contractor of commercial buildings.

Lamartiniere draws from 46 years in the fenestration industry. He most recently served as a sales representative in the region for U.S. Aluminum. Prior to this, he worked in Louisiana at Allen Glass and at Good Neighbor Glass.

Based on his extensive experience, Lamartiniere says, “I see Tubelite’s storefront and ForceFront™ Storm hurricane impact products as essential to our market. We already have attracted many new customers and see more opportunity ahead.”

Cultivating these opportunities, Lamartiniere and Tubelite are exhibiting at the Design-Build Conference & Expo in New Orleans, Nov. 7-9. Further supporting its clients, Tubelite is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the Construction Specification Institute (CSI), the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA), the Glass Association of North America (GANA), and an approved continuing education provider through the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Shared Learnings: How the International Green Construction Code (IgCC) will impact building design

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

The International Green Construction Code (IgCC) is the first national green model code. It is flexible, enabling jurisdictions to choose additional requirements that make the code a deeper shade of green, while paying close attention to the local climate and local regulatory requirements.

This new code is intended to provide “minimum requirements to safeguard the environment, public health, safety and general welfare;” to reduce the negative impacts and to increase positive impacts of the built environment on the natural environment and building occupants. As such, it covers natural resources, material water and energy conservation, operations and maintenance for new and existing buildings, building sites, building materials and building components (including equipment and systems). The IgCC applies to all occupancy-types, except low-rise residential buildings under the International Residential Code.

The IgCC can have a major, immediate impact. According to the Energy Information Administration, buildings generate almost 40 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions and 76 percent of all power plant generated electricity. Buildings can, and should, be designed to operate with significantly less than today’s average energy levels.

How does this complement existing rating systems or other guidelines?

Rating systems, such as LEED, are voluntary guidelines for cutting-edge applications of green building design. The IgCC establishes minimum requirements for all buildings, providing a natural complement for voluntary rating systems that extends beyond the IgCC’s baseline. Rating systems are voluntary. In contrast, a model code adopted by the jurisdiction is enforceable and has the weight of law. The U.S. Green Building Council, creator of LEED, has participated in the development of the IgCC and endorses its usage as a viable option for communities that wish to regulate minimum green building provisions.

To fully appreciate the position of the IgCC in the advancement of building performance, it is important to understand the distinction among three modes of regulation: prescriptive, performance-based and outcome-based.

* Prescriptive codes, as the term suggests, prescribe specific materials, systems or configurations, such as the R-value of insulation or the percentage of exterior surface that may be glazed.

* Performance-based codes establish performance expectations, such as a maximum amount of anticipated energy use, and proposed building designs demonstrate compliance with these expectations through computer modeling. The IgCC offers both prescriptive- and performance-based paths to compliance.

* The third, emerging mode is outcome-based. While performance-based methods predict — but do not absolutely ensure — a level of performance, an outcome-based code would require that a building actually perform to expectations as determined through the monitoring of the completed building in operation.

Prescriptive vs. Performance Paths for Energy Compliance

The prescriptive path is a set of pre-determined, simple and easy-to-follow guidelines and assembly performance values that address energy performance features in the design of a building. They do not require extensive analysis or technical support. Intended to be easily understood and applied, prescriptive requirements are basically a building assembly component checklist of required performance values that, when applied, will be accepted as having met the minimum code requirements.

The performance path defines a process by which an architect can design a building that will achieve energy code compliance with custom architectural assemblies, energy values and features, instead of a set of prescribed values. On the performance path, energy modeling is required to demonstrate that the overall reduction in energy use of the proposed building is at least as good as the minimum code requirement.

In response to the need for greater energy conservation, prescriptive path elements continue to become ever more restrictive to the point of significantly limiting design flexibility. And while relatively simple, the prescriptive path also doesn’t provide the flexibility needed to respond to integrated passive design strategies, such as maximizing daylight, strategic window placement or evaluating trade-offs of view-glazing placement with higher thermal performance assemblies.

Some examples of the fenestration limitations of the prescriptive path are:

  • Mandatory values for solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) and window performance may not necessarily be beneficial in all climate zones, where in certain instances, solar gain coming into a building can offset heating needs. Restrictions on the amount of glass and SHGC requirements also severely limit daylight penetration that can afford reduction in electric lighting and associated cooling energy consumption.
  • The prescriptive path of the IgCC mandates that solar shading devices be permanently attached on specified building orientations; however, successful design of solar shading is likely better suited to the flexibility in the performance path rather than the prescriptive path.
  • The amount of glass on a building is restricted in the prescriptive path. For example, if a designer or building owner wants more transparency, or wishes to take advantage of views or unique site opportunities, the potential to compensate with higher performance in other building assemblies is only available using the performance path and energy-modeling. The performance path affords much greater freedom of design choice. It affords the opportunity to offset different system efficiencies against others, so long as the overall energy efficiency goals are met.

On-Site Renewable Energy Systems

Building project design shall show allocated space and pathways for future installation of on-site renewable energy systems and associated infrastructure that provide the annual energy production equivalent of not less than 6.0 kBtu/ft2 for single-story buildings and not less than 10.0 kBtu/ft2 multiplied by the total roof area in ft2 for all other buildings.

Daylit area of building spaces

IgCC has very specific requirements for daylighting a building. The designer must take into account any side-lighting (vertical fenestration), rooftop monitors, skylights and tubular daylighting devices. A daylight analysis must be conducted that includes:

  • Exterior shading devices, buildings, structures and geological formations on the fenestration of the proposed building and on the ground and other light reflecting surfaces.
  • Movable exterior fenestration shading devices.
  • Blinds, shades and other movable interior fenestration shading devices.
  • Automatic daylight controls.
  • Dynamic glazing.

Permanent Projections

For climate zones 1–5, the vertical fenestration on the west, south and east shall be shaded by permanent projections that have an area-weighted average Projection Factor (PF) of not less than 0.50. The building is allowed to be rotated up to 45 degrees to the nearest cardinal orientation for purposes of calculations and showing compliance. The PF is the ratio of the distance the overhang projects from the window surface to its height above the sill of the window it shades.

[Courtesy of www.energycodes.gov]

Vertical Fenestration Area

The total vertical fenestration area shall be less than 40% of the gross wall area. This requirement supersedes the requirement in Section 5.5.4.2.1 of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1. Keep in mind that the vertical fenestration of a building may be allowed to exceed 40% by using the Performance Path for energy compliance.

Maximum U-Factors and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient

The table below shows the U-Factor and SHGC requirements for climate zone 5 per the IgCC (in green on the map below).


These performance requirements present a real challenge to the architectural aluminum industry. Many manufacturers are responding to the need for more energy efficient glazing systems by developing new and improved thermal break technology, such as: double pour and debridge, thermal strut and curtainwall fiberglass pressure plates.

The thermal analysis below shows that using standard storefront with a single thermal break and glass with a Center of Glass (COG) U-Factor of 0.30, does not meet the “Assembly U-Factor” code requirement of 0.35 of less.


The adoption of the IgCC is a step toward achieving the goal of carbon neutrality in building construction by 2030. The IgCC is the first model code to include sustainability measures for the entire construction project and its site — from design through construction, certificate of occupancy and beyond. The new code is expected to make buildings more efficient, reduce waste and have a positive impact on health, safety and community welfare. We will all need to become more familiar with this new code as it gets adopted by states and municipalities.

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Resources:
The American Institute of Architects’ Guide to the IgCC, http://www.aia.org/advocacy/AIAB085336

International Code Council (ICC) and the IgCC, http://www.iccsafe.org/cs/IgCC/Pages/default.aspx?r=IgCC

ICC PowerPoint – Overview of the 2012 IgCC, http://www.iccsafe.org/cs/IGCC/Documents/Media/2012_IgCC-Overview.pps

ICC Book – Green Building: A Professional’s Guide to Concepts, Codes, and Innovation, http://www.iccsafe.org/Store/Pages/Product.aspx?id=7702S11

Windows for High Performance Commercial Buildings, http://www.commercialwindows.org

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Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Event: ArchitectureBoston Expo, Nov. 14-16

Representatives from Tubelite will be in SIGCO’s booth #930 at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center for ArchitectureBoston Expo 2012. Watch the ABx website for more information about the conference.

Event: Design-Build Conference and Expo, Nov. 7-9

Representatives from Tubelite will be in booth #750 at New Orleans’ Ernest N. Morial Convention Center for the 2012 Design-Build Conference & Expo. Watch the Design-Build Institute of America (DBIA) website for more information about the conference.

Event: West Michigan Design and Construction Expo, Oct. 25

Tubelite will be exhibiting at West Michigan Design and Construction Expo, hosted by the Builders Exchange of Michigan and the Grand Rapids Chapter of the Construction Specification Institute (CSI Grand Rapids).

The event will be held, Oct. 25, 1-7 p.m., at the Deltaplex Arena in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Shared Learnings: Shedding Light on Photovoltaics

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

Photovoltaics convert light energy into electrical energy. The word “photovoltaic” is derived from photo, the Greek word for light, and volt, relating to electricity pioneer Alessandro Volta.

In 1954, Bell Labs in the U.S. introduced the first solar photovoltaic (PV) device that produced a useful amount of electricity, and by the late 1950s solar cells were being used in small-scale scientific and commercial applications, especially for the U.S. space program.

The International Space Station relies on PVs for its electrical needs.

Photo Courtesy NASA.

The Mars Rover is powered by photovoltaics. PVs work on other planets!

When PVs were first introduced into the marketplace back in the late 1970s they were very expensive, not very efficient and not for the average residential or commercial construction project. In recent years, PVs have seen a huge surge in popularity and integration into building designs. The cost per “peak watt” continues to decline as the efficiency of solar cells continues to improve and more firms are manufacturing PV panels. We’ve seen a new industry of local solar companies sprout up to meet the demand for design and installation services.

The graph below shows the cost of PVs in dollars per watt has fallen from over $10 in 1998 to less than $6 in 2012.

Graph courtesy of National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

The opportunity for building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) looks extremely promising. BIPV is set to become one of the fastest-growing segments in the solar industry with up to 4.6 GW of installations forecast through 2017. Pike Research sees BIPV as one of the fastest growing solar markets.

Building Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) utilize the PV panels as part of the envelope of the building. Instead of installing PV panels to existing roof or wall areas, with BIPV, the panels are the roof or wall. This reduces the net cost of the PV system by deducting for the cost of the glass, spandrel panel or skylight that is being replaced. Building Applied Photovoltaics (BAPV) do not have this benefit.
The graphic below shows that BIPV/BAPV revenues have the potential to grow from about $600 million in 2012 to $2.5 billion in just five years.

With expectations of 4.6 GW worth of installations of the coming five years, Pike Research sees BIPV as one of the fastest-growing solar markets. That will be especially true during the next two years, while the global market should reach close to $2.5 billion by 2017 in the analyst company’s “base” scenario. Figures: Pike Research.

Reproduced with permission. ©2012 Navigant Consulting, Inc. All rights reserved.

BIPV installations require coordination among several entities. The general contractor, glazing contractor, electrical contractor, aluminum framing manufacturer, PV panel manufacturer and solar energy consultant must all understand what is required and who is responsible for each portion of work.

  • Who will install the PV panels in the glazing system?
  • How will the electrician wire the PV panels as they are installed?
  • Will wiring be routed within the framing system? Will the framing system need to be modified to accept the wiring?
  • Do the bidding documents clearly define who will bid what portion of the work?

The diagram below shows how PV panels were installed in the Tiger Woods Learning Center in California. The curtainwall was fabricated with access holes in the tongues to allow for the wring to be run down the mullion.

Diagram compliments of Wausau Window and Wall Systems.
How cost effective BIPVs can be depends on several factors, such as:

  • Anticipated amount of sunlight at the building site. Is there the potential for shading from other buildings or trees? Some areas of the U.S. get much more sunlight than others. By the way, PVs work with sunlight, not solar heat. A cold climate has no adverse affect on the performance of the solar cells. In fact, a bright, clear, cold winter day will show improved performance over a hot summer day.

The map below shows the potential for PV performance across the country.

Map courtesy National Renewable Resource Laboratory.

  • Are the panels facing due south for maximum efficiency?
  • Are the panels on a slope or are they in a vertical wall. Tilted panels will perform better.
  • How much was saved by eliminating other building fenestration products and replacing them with PVs?
  • Is “net metering” allowed? This allows the building owner to sell back to the utility any excess solar energy being generated. In some cases, you can literally watch the electric meter spin backward!
  • Are there local and/or state tax incentives or grants? This site has a wealth of information on renewable energy financial incentives: www.dsireusa.org
  • Is their special financing available?
  • Does the electrical utility provide any funding or rebates? Some utilities are willing to help fund PV installations in return for them getting Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) for the installation. These RECs can be used by the utility to show that they are generating a certain portion of their power from renewable energy.

Many times, it’s not just the “payback” that interests building owners to opt for BIPV. What’s the return on investment (ROI)? Most solar PVs will last 25 years or more. How much will electricity cost in 2020, just eight years away? Is depreciation allowed on the installation?

Sometimes, in the end, building owners simply see this as the right thing to do for them and the environment by generating non-polluting, renewable, made in the U.S., domestic energy.

**

Resources:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), www.nrel.gov
Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), www.dsireusa.org
Pike Research, www.pikeresearch.com

**

Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Event: Glassbuild America in Las Vegas

Tubelite’s booth staff at Glassbuild America in Las Vegas: Steve Green, Mary Olivier, Stacy Schafer and Walt Lutzke welcomed many current customers and several prospective new accounts during the three days of the show, September 12, 13 and 14th. Some of the products featured in this year’s display included Tubelite’s ForceFront Blast and Storm resistant framing, and a new Fiberglass pressure plate for 400 Series Curtain Wall for increased thermal performance.

Tubelite’s ForceFront Storm Door was demonstrated onn the show floor with an impact test performed by Architectural Testing Inc. The doors and glass successfully withstood a large missle impact.


(L to R) Stacy Schafer, Steve Green, Walt Lutzke and Mary Olivier


The crowd listens to Architectural Testing Inc. describe the testing process


Tubelite door showing results of large missile impact

Event: CONSTRUCT Conference and Expo

Terry Robinholt, Terry Crosson & Don Walker

Tom Minnon, Terry Robinholt, Terry Crosson, and Don Walker represented Tubelite at this year’s CONSTRUCT conference and expo in Phoenix, AZ, September 12, 13 and 14th. Architectural Specifier’s learned about Tubelite’s ForceFront Blast and Storm resistant framing products, in addition to the full line of aluminum swing doors, storefronts, and curtain wall systems.

Tubelite’s 400 Series curtainwall featured on Montana’s Pompeys Pillar National Monument

Designed for low- and mid-rise applications, the durable framework of Tubelite Inc.’s 400 Series curtainwall can be seen on such notable projects as Pompeys Pillar National Monument.

Located 25 miles east of Billings, Montana, Pompeys Pillar is the site of the only remaining physical evidence on the trail of the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1803-1806. It was designated as a National Monument in 2001 to commemorate and emphasize Captain William Clark’s journey along the Yellowstone River from Bozeman to the confluence of the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers.

Captain Clark carved his name into the face of the 150-foot butte on July 25, 1806 during his return to the United States through the Yellowstone Valley. He named the Pillar “Pompeys Tower” in honor of Sacagawea’s son, Jean Baptiste Charbonneau, whom he had nicknamed “Pomp.”

The Apsáalooke Tribe, also known as the Crow Nation, continues to use the Pillar for vision quests and as a prayer site. The Apsáalooke people called the Pillar “the place where the Mountain Lion lives,” because the north face’s natural sandstone formation resembles a mountain lion’s head.

The Pompeys Pillar National Monument is open April 30-October 15. The information center was designed by Denver-based Anderson Mason Dale Architects. CCM Inc. of Hardin, Mont., was the general contractor. Glazing contractor Associated Glass of Billings, Mont., installed Tubelite’s system in 2005.

Tubelite’s 400 Series curtainwall provides industry-leading structural performance reducing the need for steel reinforcing. This system has a 2.5-inch sightline and the strength of back members varying in depth from 4 to 8 inches. An exterior screw-applied pressure bar secures the glass. Snap-on covers, available in a wide range of colors, allow for different finishes on interior and exterior exposed surfaces. Silicone glazed verticals are available for a seamless appearance.

The aluminum used to produce this curtainwall can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes. For Pompeys Tower, a Dark Bronze anodize was used to complement the natural woodwork and natural landscape.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Tubelite’s LEED accredited professionals share sustainable design knowledge

As members of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), Tubelite Inc. supports building projects that are designed and constructed to meet LEED® Rating Systems’ criteria. Exemplifying the company’s commitment to sustainable design, Tom Minnon, eastern regional sales manager, and Brian Tobias, estimator, are LEED Accredited Professionals. Gerard Schoeb, a structural and applications engineer, is a LEED Green Associate.

They share their knowledge of green building products and practices through presentations and articles, such as with the USGBC, Architects’ Guide to Glass and Metal, Metal Architecture, the American Institute of Architects (AIA), and the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI).

Tubelite provides storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylight control systems to commercial building teams. These products can contribute to projects pursuing certification through the LEED Rating Systems in the areas of daylighting and views, thermal comfort and energy efficiency, low-emitting materials and recycled content. The aluminum used to produce these products can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes.

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aLuminate light shelves by Tubelite accentuate daylighting designs

Tubelite Inc. offerss aLuminate™ light shelves, supporting U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® Rating Systems’ criteria for daylighting and views, thermal comfort, optimized energy performance and recycled content. aLuminate‘s reflector extrusions feature a wave-type pattern that diffuses sunlight and projects it deep into the room. Increasing the reach of natural light into an interior space helps reduce the energy demands associated with artificial lighting.

aLuminate light shelves are designed for use with Tubelite’s curtainwall and storefront systems. aLuminate light shelves also are compatible with many other manufacturers’ aluminum framing systems, during new construction or as a retrofit application.

The light shelves are available in 18-, 24-, 30- and 36-inch in-rigger projection depths with horizontal spans up to 60 inches. “They are easy-to-install thanks to a unique, in-rigger bracket that fastens at the interior vertical framing member, and snap-fits with the light-weight reflector blades,” says Mary Olivier, Tubelite’s marketing manager. “The bracket system and the light-weight material also makes it easy to remove individual sections for glass cleaning or future renovations.”

The aluminum used to produce light shelves can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes. All of Tubelite’s architectural products’ painted finishes are applied in an environmentally effective manner to control 100% of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOC-free and ultra low-VOC finishing options also are available

Typically, light shelves’ upward facing surfaces are painted bright white for maximum reflectivity and diffusion of sunlight. aLuminate light shelves also may be finished to match, or to accent, adjacent framing materials and décor. If desired, the reflector extrusions’ top and bottom surfaces can be finished in different colors.

To learn more about aLuminate light shelves by Tubelite and other environmentally responsible, energy-saving, finished products, please visit www.tubeliteinc.com.

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Tubelite offers ForceFront Storm hurricane-resistant systems

Providing optimal strength and performance for low- and mid-rise buildings, Tubelite Inc. ForceFront™ Storm hurricane resistant storefront and curtainwall systems are designed for compliance with High Velocity Hurricane Zone (HVHZ) Windzone 3 and Miami Dade – Large Missile Impact Level D (ASTM E1886/E1996 –
TAS 201).

Tubelite’s ForceFront Storm products’ design allows for dry glazing to be done on the job site. The aluminum used to produce these storefront and curtainwall systems can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content
aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes.

The majority of Tubelite’s standard product lines also have received
Florida Product Approval.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Tubelite names Charlie Hall as client development manager for Virginia

Tubelite, Inc. has named Charlie Hall as client development manager in Virginia working with G. Bowie and Associates. As part of the manufacturer’s representative team, he will provide Tubelite’s glazing contractors and architectural clients with storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems.

Hall says that he is particularly impressed with Tubelite’s ForceFront™ Storm and Blast products: “For much of Virginia, hurricane impact products are required by code to protect occupants against the extreme coastal conditions. For many government projects in the area, blast mitigating systems are essential. There also are many opportunities in the area to help healthcare facilities, universities and schools that need products with protective performance, low-maintenance durability and long-lasting, reliable operation.”

Prior to joining G. Bowie & Associates in 2011, Hall worked in construction and property mortgage financing. Earlier in his career, he was a television news journalist and videographer, as well as a marketing representative for various NASCAR sponsor displays. He earned a bachelor’s degree in mass communications from East Tennessee State University.

G. Bowie & Associates draws from more than 30 years of experience in commercial building products and services, working closely with architects, glazing contractors and consultants throughout the Southeast and mid-Atlantic regions. Based in Nashville, Tenn., the company acts as knowledgeable, educational and technical resources on building enclosure products serving Tubelite’s clients in Tennessee, Alabama, Kentucky and now Virginia.

Further supporting its clients, Tubelite is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the Construction Specification Institute (CSI), the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA), the Glass Association of North America (GANA), and an approved continuing education provider through the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

To contact Charlie Hall and to learn more about Tubelite’s products, please click here.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Event: ALA Product Show, Oct. 16

On Oct. 16, Tubelite will be at the Association of Licensed Architects (ALA) Architecture Conference and Product Show held at the Drury Lane Conference Center, Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois. Aaron Zorn will present “Energy Efficient Windows” a 90-minute CES offering 1.5 LUs.

Tubelite welcomes Don Walker serving clients in Oklahoma and northern Texas

Don Walker has joined Tubelite Inc. as a client development manager for Oklahoma and northern Texas. Well-known in the area, he will provide glazing contractors and clients in the area with storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems.

For more than three decades, Walker’s career has been dedicated to the fenestration industry. He worked for Atlas Architectural Metals in Dallas as the company’s customer service manager and moved into sales management. For the past 20 years, Walker was employed by U.S. Aluminum in Waxahachie, Texas. He began with the customer service team and for the last 12 years, served as a sales representative covering northeast and central Texas.

Walker graduated from East Texas State University (now Texas A & M) with a Bachelor of Science. After graduating from college, he served with the U.S. Air Force for four years. He has continued to volunteer within his community and industry, including as a member of the Texas Glass Association’s North Texas Division.

Further supporting its clients, Tubelite is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the Construction Specification Institute (CSI), the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA), the Glass Association of North America (GANA), and an approved continuing education provider through the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

To contact Don Walker and to learn more about Tubelite’s products, please click here.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

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Tubelite’s Monumental Doors

Tubelite Inc.’s Monumental Doors feature a durable tie-rod construction, 5-inch-wide stiles, up to 10-inch-high bottom rails and heavy-duty hardware to withstand high traffic. The framing may be reinforced with steel and used with a continuous hinge for maximum strength and dependability. The aluminum for these door products can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes. Thermal barriers also can be specified to enhance energy efficiency.

 

 

 

 

 

Shared Learnings: LEED® Guidelines and Fenestration Design, part 2 of 2

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

In the second half of this two-part blog, we continue our look at how “smart” fenestration designs and applications can significantly improve a building’s performance using the guidelines in the LEED® Rating System. This month we’ll take a look at Thermal Comfort, Daylighting and Views to the Outdoors.

Materials and Resources Credit 5: Regional Materials

Intent: To increase demand for building materials and products that are extracted and manufactured within the region, thereby supporting the use of indigenous resources and reducing the environmental impacts resulting from transportation.

Strategy: Use building materials or products that have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured, within 500 miles of the project site for a minimum of 10% or 20%, based on cost, of the total materials value.

Note: Aluminum is manufactured from mined (extracted) bauxite. There are no bauxite mines in the United States. Therefore, regardless of where the manufacturer is located, aluminum framing systems do not qualify for this credit. LEED version 4.0, due out next year, will require manufacturers and their raw material suppliers to meet disclosure and responsible sourcing requirements.

This map below shows the world’s output of bauxite. The closest bauxite mines to the United States are in Jamaica.

Indoor Environmental Quality Credit 6.2: Controllability of Systems – Thermal Comfort

Intent: To provide a high level of thermal comfort system control by individual occupants or groups in multi-occupant spaces (e.g., classrooms or conference areas) and promote their productivity, comfort and wellbeing. Operable windows may be used in lieu of controls for occupants located 20 feet inside and 10 feet to either side of the operable part of a window.

Strategies:
* Design the building and systems with comfort controls to allow adjustments to suit individual needs or those of groups in shared spaces.
* Designs can include operable windows or hybrid systems integrating operable windows with mechanical systems.

The photo below shows Wausau Window and Wall Systems’ curtainwall system on the Omni San Diego Hotel with “zero sightline” vents as an integral part of the framing system. These windows appear to be fixed glazing when closed.

Indoor Environmental Quality – Daylight and Views
Credit 8.1: Provide daylight to 75% of regularly occupied spaces
Credit 8.2: Provide direct line of sight to the outdoors for building occupants in 90% of all regularly occupied areas

Intent: To provide building occupants with a connection between indoor spaces and the outdoors through the introduction of daylight and views into the regularly occupied areas of the building.

Strategies:
* Design the space to maximize daylighting and view opportunities.
* Daylighting strategies to consider include exterior sun shades, interior light shelves and high-performance glazing.
* Views strategies to consider include interior glazing partitions.

The photo below shows Tubelite’s Max/Block™ exterior sun shades installed on a storefront system. Note that the sun shades are installed about 2 feet below the top of the opening. This allows for natural daylight to be transmitted through the glass above the sun shades. Using an interior light shelf will help disperse daylight farther into the room and minimize glare near the windows.

The diagram below shows sun angles for various times of the year in Nashville, Tenn.

Complying with LEED requirements does not have to be a daunting experience. It is important for all parties involved to know upfront if the project will pursue LEED certification. In some cases, the architectural aluminum manufacturer will need to know if there is a specific requirement for recycled content. Total system U-Factors and Solar Heat Gain Coefficients will need to be calculated to ensure that the thermal performance of the fenestration meets the design intent. Substituting products must be carefully reviewed – installing a different type of glass than what was specified may have adverse effects on the heating and cooling loads and daylighting.

The best way to determine if a project is following LEED guidelines is to review Division 1 of the specifications. AIA MasterSpec® Section 01 81 13 Sustainable Design Requirements reads: “This Section includes general requirements and procedures for compliance with certain U.S. Green Building Council‘s (USGBC) LEED® prerequisites and credits needed for the Project to obtain LEED [Certified] [Silver] [Gold] [Platinum] certification. Other LEED prerequisites and credits needed to obtain LEED certification are dependent on material selections and may not be specifically identified as LEED requirements. Compliance with requirements needed to obtain LEED prerequisites and credits may be used as one criterion to evaluate substitution requests.”

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Resources:
LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations Rating System (PDF)
U.S. Green Building Council
Tubelite Inc.
Wausau Window and Wall Systems

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Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Tubelite’s 14000 Series Storefront

Tubelite Inc. 14000 Series Storefront flush-glazed system helps meet low-rise buildings’ energy, daylighting and sustainability goals. Extra-heavy intermediate verticals may be specified for strong windloads. The system’s standard framing is available with thermally improved members for optimal strength and thermal performance and is compatible with Tubelite’s Narrow, Medium and Wide Stile Doors. The storefront and entrance systems’ aluminum can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes.

Events: AIA North Dakota Expo, Sept. 24-25

Tubelite will be exhibiting at the AIA North Dakota Conference & Building Products Exposition, Sept. 24-25 at the Best Western Ramkota Hotel in Bismarck.

Watch the chapter website for more details.

Shared Learnings: LEED® Guidelines and Fenestration Design, part 1 of 2

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

Not every building is designed to achieve LEED® certification, but using the guidelines in the LEED Rating System can help lower utility costs, minimize the impact on our environment and improve occupant comfort levels. In this two-part blog, we’ll take a look at how “smart” fenestration designs and applications can significantly improve a building’s performance. Part one focuses on Energy & Atmosphere, Materials & Resources and Indoor Environmental Quality.

Energy & Atmosphere Credit 1: Optimize Energy Performance

Intent: To achieve increasing levels of energy performance to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.

Strategies:
* Design the building envelope and systems to maximize energy performance. Utilize aluminum and glass manufacturers’ most energy efficient products.
* Determine required minimum total system U-Factor based on aluminum framing system and glass type. Reference National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) 100-2010: “Procedure for Determining Fenestration Product U-Factors.”
* Determine required maximum Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC). Reference NFRC 200-2010: “Procedure for Determining Fenestration Product Solar Heat Gain Coefficient and Visible Transmittance at Normal Incidence.”

Recent improvements in thermal break technology have helped aluminum glazing systems become more energy efficient due to conductive heat loss. The graphics below show a true thermally broken curtainwall, thermally broken entrance with frame, and a fiberglass pressure plate for conventional curtainwall. The fiberglass provides a significant improvement over the more common aluminum pressure plate.

Energy and Atmosphere Credit 2: On-Site Renewable Energy

Intent: To encourage and recognize increasing levels of on-site renewable energy self-supply to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use.

Strategy:
Consider integrating photovoltaic (PV) panels as part of the storefront and/or curtainwall glazing systems. Where natural daylight is desired, some PV panel manufacturers offer semi-transparent building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) modules that can generate electricity and transmit light.

The Tiger Woods Learning Center incorporated a 21-by-65-foot curtainwall system by Wausau Window and Wall Systems utilizing photovoltaic modules from SCHOTT North America, Inc. The lites varied in opacity and power-generation: The top panels of the PV array produce 72 watts each with an opacity of 5%, while the lower panels offer 25% opacity and produce 60 watts of energy. The BIPV system can produce 3,800 kilowatts of energy per year.

Materials and Resources Credit 4: Recycled Content

Intent: To increase demand for building products that incorporate recycled content materials, thereby reducing impacts resulting from extraction and processing of virgin materials. This credit requires the total recycled content of the building based on cost be 10% for one point or 20% for two points.

Strategies:
* Use materials with recycled content such that the sum of postconsumer recycled content plus half of the pre-consumer content constitutes at least 10% or 20% of the total value of the materials in the project.
* Identify aluminum framing manufacturers that provide significant recycled aluminum content in their systems.

Aluminum requires significant amounts of energy to convert bauxite to the finished goods. The “Embodied Energy” in prime aluminum is more than 100,000 BTUs per pound. However, it only takes 1/5 of that energy to process recycled aluminum. By recycling aluminum, we recover the energy that was used in converting bauxite to aluminum in the smelting process.

Indoor Environmental Quality Credit 4.1: Low-Emitting Materials – Adhesives and Sealants

Intent: To reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that is odorous, irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and wellbeing of installers and occupants. All adhesives and sealants used on the interior of the building (i.e., inside of the weatherproofing system and applied on-site) must comply with the following requirements as applicable to the project scope.

Strategies:
* Specify low volatile organic compound (low-VOC) materials in construction documents. Ensure that VOC limits are clearly stated in each section of the specifications where adhesives and sealants are addressed.
* Adhesives, sealants and sealant primers must comply with South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule #1168. VOC limits listed in the table below need to be adhered to for storefront and curtainwall installations:

Application  –  VOC Limit (grams/liter less water)
Structural Glazing Adhesives  –  100
Architectural Sealants  –  250
Sealant Primers, nonporous  –  250
Sealant Primers, porous  –  775

Indoor Environmental Quality Credit 4.2: Low-Emitting Materials—Paints and Coatings

Intent: To reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that is odorous, irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and wellbeing of installers and occupants.

Strategies:
* For projects that require on-site painting or repair of a buildings interior, specify low-VOC paints and coatings in construction documents. Ensure that VOC limits are clearly stated in each section of the specifications where paints and coatings are addressed.
* Track the VOC content of all interior paints and coatings during construction.
Note: With the exception of possible field repair of finishes, this requirement does not pertain to architectural aluminum anodizing or paint. All finishes are applied off-site and will not contribute to contaminants in the building.

Kynar® paint has been the proven mainstay in the architectural market for decades. The primary environmental concern with liquid paints is the solvents used to deliver the paint to the part; some of the solvents used are considered VOC content and must be destroyed. Environmentally conscious finishers, such as Linetec, use a 100% air capture system and destroy the VOCs with a regenerative thermal oxidizer, so there is no adverse environmental impact.

Next month’s blog will continue with LEED credit categories 5, 6 and 8.

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Resources:
LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations Rating System (PDF)
U.S. Green Building Council
Tubelite Inc.
Wausau Window and Wall Systems
SCHOTT semi-transparent photovoltaic modules
Linetec aluminum finishing
Kynar 500® FSF® paint

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Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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George Rand to serve Tubelite clients in eastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey

Tubelite Inc. has hired George Rand as a client development manager for eastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey. As the owner of Rand Sales & Marketing Co., he will provide glazing contractors and architectural clients in the area with storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems.

Rand draws from more than 30 years of experience in commercial, historic and upscale residential construction. He earned his bachelor of science from the University of New Haven in Connecticut. Since then, he has worked for several glazing contractors and fenestration product manufacturers, including being Kawneer’s New York City architectural representative and New Jersey territory manager.

His knowledge and involvement in commercial construction begins with the earliest phases of design through project completion. For the past decade he has shared his expertise as the owner of Rand Sales & Marketing Co. The company serves as a manufacturer’s representative in New Jersey, Delaware and eastern Pennsylvania, providing architectural products to glass and glazing contractors, designers and architects.

Further supporting its clients, Tubelite is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the Construction Specification Institute (CSI), the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA), the Glass Association of North America (GANA), and an approved continuing education provider through the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

To contact George Rand and to learn more about Tubelite’s products, please click here.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Tubelite names Carla Styles to serve clients in the Western region

Carla Styles joins Tubelite Inc. as a client development manager for the Western territory. She will provide clients in Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Wyoming and Montana with storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems.

Most recently, Styles worked for Oldcastle Building Envelope as an architectural sales representative for national accounts, and previously, as a sales representative. Prior to this, she was an outside sales representative for Arch Aluminum and Glass. Before beginning her career in the architectural aluminum and glass industry, Styles served in the U.S. Air Force.

Born and raised in Colorado, Styles lives in Fort Collins and brings a strong familiarity with the territory and with construction in general. “I love working with the people in this region. I appreciate that Tubelite encourages a collaborative, consultative relationship in sharing knowledge and resources. I understand why the company has earned such a positive reputation,” says Styles.

With respect to the territory’s warm climate, Styles adds that she is especially impressed with Tubelite’s energy-efficient and daylight control systems to meet the needs of the Western territory. These include Therml=Block™ entrance and curtainwall systems, aLuminate™ light shelves, and Max/Block™ sun shades.

Tubelite also provides ForceFront™ Storm and Blast specialty products; standard doors, windows, storefront and curtainwall. The aluminum used to produce these products can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes.

Further supporting its clients, Tubelite is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the Construction Specification Institute (CSI), the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA), the Glass Association of North America (GANA), and an approved continuing education provider through the American Institute of Architects (AIA). Locally, Styles is a member of CSI Denver and the Colorado Glazing Contractors Association (CGCA).

To contact Carla Styles and to learn more about Tubelite’s products, please visit www.tubeliteinc.com.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Tubelite’s Therml=Block doors support energy efficiency, install quickly and deliver dependable operation

Contributing to environmental and energy-efficiency goals, Tubelite Inc. offers Therml=Block™ door products with thermal barriers. These insulated doors and frames are manufactured for quick installation and, once installed, reduce the transfer of hot and cold temperatures, mitigate interior frost build-up and require minimal maintenance for long-lasting, smooth operation.

Mary Olivier, Tubelite’s marketing manager explains, “The door and frame utilize an I-shaped thermal strut reinforced with 25% nylon fiber. When matched with high-performance glass, Tubelite’s Therml=Block entrance systems dramatically improve performance in all categories, including U-factor and CRF. In addition, each assembled extrusion must pass a shear test of 1,000-pound minimum.”

The doors are available in both 4-inch Medium Stile and 5-inch Wide Stile. There also are options for a 4-inch, mid-rail and rabbet stiles for continuous hinge application. The meeting stile on a pair of doors includes Tubelite’s improved, adjustable astragal and standard weathering. The aluminum, thermal door frame’s exterior face displays a 2-inch sightline and 4.5-inch depth.

The aluminum for Therml=Block door products can be extruded by Tubelite using EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes. The door and frames’ construction allows for different finishes to match both exterior and interior color schemes. Tubelite’s painted finishes are applied and controlled in an environmentally effective manner.

Tubelite’s Therml=Block door products join the company’s other energy-saving products, which include the Therml=Block 300ES Curtainwall. These curtainwall and entrance systems can be paired with Tubelite’s daylight control systems, such as Max/Block™ sun shades and aLuminate™ light shelves. With the combined benefits of thermal performance, daylighting and recycled content, these products may assist projects pursuing certification through the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® Rating Systems.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Shared Learnings: Controlling Storefront and Curtainwall Water Infiltration

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

Most architectural aluminum glazing systems are not designed to be totally waterproof. Rather, most systems are designed to control water infiltration under extreme conditions and weep that water back to the exterior. Storefront and curtainwall systems differ in many ways: appearance, profiles, wind load resistance, glazing, thermal performance and how they weep water. This discussion focuses on how storefront and curtainwall handle water disbursement differently.

Storefront

Storefront systems control water infiltration by directing all moisture to the sill flashing (1). It is imperative that the sill flashing be installed correctly. Most aluminum manufacturers have introduced high-performance sill flashing designs that allow the installer to fasten the flashing to the bottom of the opening prior to installing the storefront framing. A watertight seal can then be applied over the fastener head (2). The sill then sets on top of the flashing with no need for fasteners penetrating the sill flashing. Unlike the old sill flashing designs, these high-performance sill flashings utilize two weep holes in the sill flashing at each lite of glass (3). These extrusions also have a much higher back leg for better water performance, and it is important to make sure that sealant is applied to the top of the back leg prior to installing the sill (4).

Assuming that the sill flashing is installed correctly, the most important element in controlling water penetration with storefront is the proper fastening and sealing of end dams (5). Without end dams, water will intrude into the jamb locations of the building. In the photo below you can see where improperly (or missing) end dams have caused significant water damage to the interior drywall, even though sill flashing was present.

Improper sill flashing

Water deflectors must be installed wherever a horizontal mullion occurs in storefront. These direct any water that reaches the horizontal over to the vertical mullion where it weeps out at the sill flashing. Deflectors are necessary to ensure that the water bypasses the lite of glass below the horizontal. Without water deflectors, moisture likely will settle on the top of the glass, allowing water to enter the interior and causing possible failure of the insulating glass unit.

Storefront water deflector

Curtainwall

With curtainwall, we want to prevent any water from reaching the vertical mullion. Each horizontal mullion must have zone dams (sometimes called “joint plugs”) properly installed and sealed at the vertical. Any water that makes its way to the vertical mullion ultimately will end up on the interior of the building.

Unlike storefront, which directs all water to the sill, curtainwall weeps water at each individual lite of glass through holes in the pressure plate. Because most curtainwall systems are used on taller elevations with higher wind loads, the amount of water entering the system is typically greater than the capacity of strorefront mullions and sill flashing. This is why each lite of glass is individually weeped. There are critical steps that must be taken to ensure that no water penetrates a curtainwall system.

Each pressure plate must have two weep holes ABOVE the horizontal tongue (1). Similarly, each face cover requires two weep holes (2). All too often, field failures of curtainwall are directly due to improperly installed zone dams or incorrect placement or missing weep holes.

Since water is not directed down the vertical mullions to the sill, curtainwall does not require sill flashing. However, care must be taken in handling the caulk joints at the sill. The exterior caulk joint must be behind the face cover since water is weeping out of the bottom (3). A common installation error is mistakenly applying caulking to the exterior sill and blocking the weep holes.

So, how can you ensure that a storefront and/or curtainwall system is being installed correctly?

  • Have the manufacturer’s installation instructions be included with the glazing subcontractor submittals. This will provide the architect, engineer and or general contractor a resource for field checking the installation, and they become part of the Construction Documents.
  • Carefully review submitted shop drawings. Ensure that the details correspond with the manufacturer’s recommended installation instructions.

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Resources:
Glass Association of North America
National Glass Association
Whole Building Design Guide, Building Envelope Design Guide

Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Events: Tubelite in two places at once – CSI CONSTRUCT, GlassBuild America

September 12-14, 2012,
Tubelite Inc. will be exhibiting at two industry events:
Construction Specifications Institute’s (CSI’s) CONSTRUCT show in booth #628 at Arizona’s Phoenix Convention Center,
and
GlassBuild America: The Glass, Window & Door Expo in booth #912 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

Please visit us and learn about Tubelite’s newest products.

Fred Haas joins Tubelite, serves clients in the mid-Atlantic region

Tubelite Inc. has hired Fred Haas as a client development manager to provide clients in Maryland, D.C., Delaware and northern Virginia with storefront, curtainwall, entrance and daylighting systems.

Haas most recently worked for Oldcastle Building Envelope as a sales representative for the same region. His previous employers include Zephyr Aluminum, LLC of Lancaster, Pa.; Caplan Bros. Glass in Baltimore; Harmon, Inc.’s Baltimore office; and J Keller Glass Inc. of North Beach, Md.

Prior to his 16-year career in the architectural metal products, glass and glazing industry, Haas was a professional lacrosse player for seven years with the Baltimore Thunder. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Baltimore’s Loyola College and is a life-long avid photographer.

A resident of Abingdon, Md., Haas is familiar with the area’s needs. “Tubelite has built a reputation for dependable service that’s known and respected in this region. Ideal for projects in D.C. and Maryland, the company offers recycled aluminum and has developed a blast-mitigating system,” says Haas.

Tubelite offers EcoLuminum™, a high recycled-content aluminum billet composition with eco-friendly, durable finishes for all of its products. These include: energy-efficient Therml=Block™ entrances; ForceFront™ Storm and Blast specialty products; standard doors, windows, storefront and curtainwall; and aLuminate™ light shelf and Max/Block™ sun shade daylight control systems.

Further supporting its clients, Tubelite is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council, the Construction Specification Institute, the American Architectural Manufacturers Association, the Glass Association of North America, and an approved continuing education provider through the American Institute of Architects (AIA). This May, Haas shared Tubelite’s educational resources with architects at the AIA National Convention in D.C.

To learn more about Tubelite’s products and connect with its representatives, please click here.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

Shared Learnings: AIA 2012 Preview

by Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, Eastern Region Sales Manager for Tubelite Inc.

As the American Institute of Architects (AIA) 2012 National Convention and Design Exposition opens in Washington, D.C., exhibitors will be showcasing new technology and products for use in the glass and glazing industry. One focal point will be increasing the thermal performance of commercial glazing systems. This has become paramount as new energy codes continue to be adopted and enforced. Here are some highlights from the exhibit floor.

Triple Glazing

Viracon’s VE 1-2M has these characteristics:
63% Visible Light Transmission
0.21 U-Value, 0.34 Solar Heat Gain Coefficient

Viracon, and other glass fabricators, offer triple-glazed units that minimize heat transfer improving overall thermal performance. However, while a third pane of glass adds to the insulating value of the assembly, it also reduces the visible light transmission (VT) and the solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC). Adding a low-E coating to a surface, or multiple surfaces, of the triple-pane unit will also increase the energy performance, but it may (depending on the type of low-E coating) affect the SHGC and VT. Filling the space between the panes of glass with argon and/or krypton gas will also improve energy performance.

A third pane of glass increases the weight and thickness of the unit, which can make mounting and handling more difficult and transportation more expensive. There are physical and economic limits to the number of glass panes that can be added to a window assembly and the thermal performance benefits diminish as well. Care should be taken to ensure that the architectural aluminum framing system can support the additional weight of triple-glazed units, which average about 10 pounds per square foot.
Booth 3825

Suspended Films
A suspended plastic film can be substituted for the middle layer of glass in a triple-glazed unit. The light weight of the plastic film is advantageous. Because it is very thin, it does not increase the unit thickness substantially.

Southwall Technologies’ Heat Mirror® technology is based upon a very thin coated film, which reflects heat back to its source. They offer 12 different films, which provide varying levels of VT and SHGC to meet the diverse requirements of the commercial market place.

Heat Mirror units can be produced with a wide range of glass substrates including clear glass, tinted glass and low-E glass. By taking advantage of the benefits of film-based coatings and glass-based technologies, they can create superior insulating performance and outstanding solar control, while blocking UV radiation, and reducing outside noise more effectively than double-pane glass.

Electronically tintable glass
Electronically tintable glass can be specified for windows, skylights and curtainwalls. It is an effective way to control sunlight without shades or blinds, so you can manage glare and heat, while maintaining a connection to the outdoors. SageGlass® offers a solution (electrochromic) that can be adjusted based on the end-users’ preferences. Pleotint, on the other hand, offers a solution (thermochromic) that automatically adjusts based on the sun’s heat.

Electronically tintable glass increases design freedom by removing sun control from the equation. Buildings can be infused with daylight without shades, blinds or louvers.
Booth 2003 and Booth 2318

Advanced Aluminum Glazing Systems
Manufacturers of aluminum storefront, curtainwall and windows have responded to the need for increased thermal performance by designing systems that will accommodate glass in thicknesses greater than the typical 1-inch units. Triple glazing is usually 1.75-inch thick (three each 0.25-inch panes of glass and two each 0.5-inch air spaces).

Wausau Window and Wall Systems, and others, can provide curtainwall and windows that will accept this glazing.
Booth 313

Lumira Aerogel
Cabot Corporation’s translucent Lumira™ aerogel maintains and enhances energy efficiency, while enabling a wide range of commercial and residential building design choices.

Aerogels are the lightest and best insulating solids in the world. Cabot’s Lumira aerogel is a hydrophobic aerogel produced as particles. Each particle consists largely of air (more than 90 percent) and is contained in a structure with pore sizes less than the mean free path of air molecules, which severely inhibits heat transfer through the material.

The inclusion of Lumira in daylighting systems virtually eliminates the historical trade-off of insulation vs. natural light by providing three to six times the thermal performance of traditional insulated fenestration products, while maintaining optimal light transmission. As a result, even large daylight surface areas can maintain high energy-efficiency by reducing thermal loads.
Several companies that offer Lumira will be exhibiting at the AIA Design Exposition.


Resources:


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Tom Minnon, LEED® AP, CDT, is the eastern region sales manager for Tubelite Inc., serving clients from Maine to Georgia. With nearly four decades of industry experience and many professional accreditations, he regularly provides educational and consultative support to architects, buildings owners and glazing contractors regarding storefront, curtainwall, entrances and daylight control systems.

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Tubelite hires Steve Mikkelson as quality manager

Tubelite Inc. has named Steve Mikkelson to the newly created position of quality manager. He works closely with Tubelite’s production and executive management teams.

“Tubelite strives to provide the highest level of quality in our storefront, entrance, curtainwall and daylight control systems,” says Mikkelson.

Most recently, Mikkelson was the supplier development manager with GHSP in Grand Haven, Mich., a leading global supplier of mechanical and mechatronic control systems. Prior to this, he worked as a program manager with GKN Sinter Metals, the world’s leading supplier of metal powder precision components. His previous employment includes positions at automotive companies supporting their quality initiatives and practices.

Mikkelson is a member of the American Society for Quality and has earned certification as a quality engineer, a quality manager and a quality auditor. His education includes a master’s degree in career and technical education and a bachelor’s degree in manufacturing technology from Western Michigan University. Currently, Mikkelson is pursuing his master’s certificate in Six Sigma.

To learn more about Tubelite’s products and connect with its representatives, please click here.

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Media contact: Heather West, heather@heatherwestpr.com

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